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 Post subject: Tenganan
PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:48 pm 
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Forum member Georges Breguet emailed me today with some information which he thought that other members might find interesting. I am going to post info on a a very interesting weaving forum on the Museums, Exhibitions, Events..... forum but thought that I would share Georges enthusiasm for geringsing and the associated ceremonies with you here.

As you may be aware, Georges has a very special interest in Indonesian textiles. In particular he has:
Quote:
"... a special relation with the village of Tenganan in Bali where I have done a lot of medical and biological fieldwork since 1976. This village is world famous for the production of the double ikat named geringsing I just want to inform you that the unique rituals of this community are still performed. They are as fantastic as before and I feel so lucky to have seen them many times in my life. Just look at the attached picture and you will understand what I am talking about. This picture was made last week, it seems incredible ! I hope to be able to finish a book on the geringsing in a couple of years."

Wonderful to see that a fine textile tradition continues as part of a living culture. Our thanks to Georges for sharing this with us.


Attachments:
TENGANANw.jpg
TENGANANw.jpg [ 65.52 KiB | Viewed 14023 times ]

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 Post subject: The geringsing looks new
PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 9:25 pm 
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Are they weaving alot of geringsings in Tenganon? Not that looking new means that it is new. Maybe Georges could generously describe the ceremony. Are they used for one ceremony only or? Thanks in advance, Georges.

Bill


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 4:38 am 
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Tenganan is an interesting subject- thank you Georges for bringing it up. Not only are their textiles unique in Bali (warp and weft ikat are also done in India and one other place that I forget right now... Japan?), but the village of Tenganan is also unique. It is laid out in 'steps': one progresses uphill, with the homes arranged along the sides with their fronts facing each other across public areas which contain 'bales' and other structures for village use, and then stone ramps for ascending to the next level. It is a very beautiful village and one of only a handful that is home to the Bali Aga, the original Balinese people. They are also known for making fine baskets, boxes, and mats from a vine that grows locally.

I was there three years ago and photographed a young woman weaving geringsing on a backstrap loom. There is quite a market demand for geringsing, especially by the Japanese, so many of the pieces are woven for sale. However, as Georges so nicely showed, their ceremonies are alive and well and geringsing is also woven for their own use. Unfortunately, I was not able to attend a ceremony, so cannot shed any light on Bill's questions.


Attachments:
Mail-Tenganan basket-mats drying.jpg
Mail-Tenganan basket-mats drying.jpg [ 62.29 KiB | Viewed 13947 times ]
Mail-Tenganan weaver4.jpg
Mail-Tenganan weaver4.jpg [ 53.79 KiB | Viewed 13947 times ]
Mail-Tenganan weaver2.jpg
Mail-Tenganan weaver2.jpg [ 37.93 KiB | Viewed 13947 times ]
Mail-Tenganan weaver1.jpg
Mail-Tenganan weaver1.jpg [ 62.29 KiB | Viewed 13947 times ]
Mail-Tenganan village street.jpg
Mail-Tenganan village street.jpg [ 57.15 KiB | Viewed 13947 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 3:19 pm 
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Thanks, Susan. I know they do a rather sloppy double ikat in Guatemala. In the first pic, what is on the ground in front of the house?

Bill


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 3:30 pm 
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Hi Bill-
Those are the baskets, boxes and mats that the village is also famous for- made of some local vines. They put them in the sun to dry.

I didn't know Guatemala had double ikat weaving! Must study up. Do you have any examples or additional information? It would be fun to spend some time in Central America for a change.

cheers,

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 9:47 pm 
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Susan

Superb weaving shots especially no 4 - great to see the weaver so carefully lining up the pattern.

Yes, double ikat is definitely done in Japan. I think we have some on the forum - yes, see 'The Kasuri Ikat Collection of Jeff Krauss' in thread http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... .php?t=303. The first photo on his home page shows some double ikat as well as weft ikat for the picture (or e-kasuri). http://e-gasuri.com/

You often see kasuri with warp and weft ikat used as futon covers. Marla Mallet has a nice and clear example at http://www.marlamallett.com/w-5213.htm Interesting that Jeff says that the pictorial kasuri is always weft ikat as you can see in this piece of Marla's that the chequer design is double but the chrysanthemum is weft and even more clearly on Jeff's homepage.

Seeing these particular Japanese designs it makes one realise how fine the Bali geringsing is - of course the Japanese recognise and appreciate the quality.

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 Post subject: Tenganan redux
PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 8:43 am 
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Some photos from a previous trip to Tenganan just surfaced, so I thought I'd post them as they show some aspects not illustrated before:

photo 1- the weaver is using a foot-braced loom, which explains the short length of the textiles because they are limited by the length of the weaver's legs, tho the continuous warp allows the piece to be twice the leg length; often the narrow textiles are used with the warps uncut as shouldercloths or around the neck

photo 2- she is using a porcupine quill to align the threads, as is traditional

photo 3- a display of geringsing for sale which shows the variety of patterns, limited colors, and approximate size

photo 4- a detail of one of the pieces in the display showing the looseness of the weave which is necessitated by the use of warp and weft ikat; note the use of handspun thread and natural colors

This thread makes me want to go to Bali again!


Attachments:
File comment: Photo 1
Mail-Tenganan weaver 1.jpg
Mail-Tenganan weaver 1.jpg [ 65.81 KiB | Viewed 13750 times ]
File comment: Photo 2
Mail-Tenganan weaver 2.jpg
Mail-Tenganan weaver 2.jpg [ 70.8 KiB | Viewed 13750 times ]
File comment: Photo 3
Mail-Tenganan geringsing display.jpg
Mail-Tenganan geringsing display.jpg [ 70.43 KiB | Viewed 13750 times ]
File comment: Photo 4
Mail-Tenganan geringsing detail 2.jpg
Mail-Tenganan geringsing detail 2.jpg [ 87.51 KiB | Viewed 13750 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 6:40 pm 
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Susan

Excellent photos! Thanks for sharing (my mantra!!!)

Just a comment on your comment:
Quote:
the weaver is using a foot-braced loom, which explains the short length of the textiles because they are limited by the length of the weaver's legs, tho the continuous warp allows the piece to be twice the leg length
The length is also a matter of choice, however, since various other weavers find ways, with a continuous warp, in giving themselves a longer run on a backstrap loom. An example can be found on page 163 of 'Textiles of Southeast Asia: Tradition, Trade and Transformation', figure 227, of
Quote:
'a Savunese wovman weaving a cloth with a warp ikat pattern on a simple backstrap tension loom'.
Here the loom has side beams with notches into which a cross bar can be slotted (different notches for different warp lengths) so that she can brace her feet against this cross-beam. The warp itself goes around a beam which is supported at a distance further away than her legs can stretch. In some other cultures I have seen the warp around a beam high up, and the feet braced much lower down, so that a longer warp length can be achieved in this way.

Also, see a photo of an illustration of Batak weaving in the early 20th century from the exhibition Woven Worlds at the Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam which attach below. Also see page 31 of Sandra Niessen's 'Batak Cloth and Clothing: A dynamic Indonesian Tradition' for a similar example of Karo Batak weavers.

Sorry, I don't mean to be 'picky' but your comment set me thinking about other textiles that I know have been woven on a continuous warp on a backstrap loom. Thanks for stimulating my 'journey'!


Attachments:
File comment: illustration of Batak weaving in the early 20th century from the exhibition Woven Worlds at the Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam
IMGP4987w.jpg
IMGP4987w.jpg [ 52.98 KiB | Viewed 13717 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2006 5:55 am 
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Pamela-
I'm glad that you caught that. After I posted it I noticed in the photo that indeed the weaver had a 'breast beam' for taking up the extra fabric. You have made some very good points, also, about how other groups adapt the body-tensioned loom. In looking thru my reference books for more information on this, I find that Sylvia Fraser-Lu, in Handwoven Textiles of Southeast Asia, p.31-35, has a good discussion of various body-tensioned (backstrap) looms and how they work, including drawings.

Thanks!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 3:25 pm 
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Greetings, I apologize for being away from the forum but I have been actively collecting.

I enjoyed reading the postings on geringsing and thought I might be able to contribute to the wonderful pictures.

I have posted a wayang geringsing of very sharp detail and excellent work which I hope the pictures show. The piece itself is backed on a black cloth. The little white tag is just my inventory tag.

Thanks again for everyone's work on this forum.

-John


Attachments:
wayang geringsing.jpg
wayang geringsing.jpg [ 62.22 KiB | Viewed 12211 times ]
double ikat detail.jpg
double ikat detail.jpg [ 195.57 KiB | Viewed 12211 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 9:11 pm 
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John

Welcome back! I was only thinking the other day that we had not heard from you for ages. You are only forgiven if you (continue) to share the fruits of your collecting intermission with us. On that note, what a come back! A fantastic textile. Beautiful image definitition. Clearly a master weaver and very careful binding of the ikat. Does the black background make the piece zing even more than usual by intensifying the dark colours? It seems that the threads are more closely packed than usual as if the weaver does not need the latitude of looser threads to line up the pattern.

Many thanks for sharing...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 4:47 am 
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Thank you so much John for remembering us and sharing such an exquisite example of a rare textile. It's a beauty! Would you be so kind as to tell us a little about it. I know what these are, but some of our readers may not be so fortunate. For instance, 'wayang' are the shadow puppets that are ubiquitous throughout Indonesia and Malaysia, but who do the figures on your textile represent? What is the symbolism of the four-pointed star in the middle and on the edges? And what was this particular piece used for? It's a rich textile, full of symbolism and ritual importance. Terimakasih!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 6:03 pm 
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Dear Pamela and Susan - may I answer both of your message together? Engineering efficiency.

I am glad you like the geringsing. It is the only one I have and one of my favorite textiles .

The black rayon backing definitely enhances the colors. I may not have given the dimensions but they are 60" x 20". I am far from an expert on geringsing or Indonesian culture but I have found this information.

The three figures are difficult to "see" at first and I am not exactly sure why they are "Wayang" unless that simply means "figures". They are apparently copied from old stone carvings. I have attached a panel of the geringsing as well as pictures of the carvings. I don't have the book sources with me but will look for them.

The "four pointed star" in the center represents the temple also pictured.

I have attached the geringsing again for convenience but this time horizontally.

I tried to post several old book pictures of women with their long nails weaving and ikating. I'll try again in another post.

I apologize for not thinking this out better and having the pictures in a more logical sequence. Is there any way to change the order once attached?

Quote:
John

Welcome back! I was only thinking the other day that we had not heard from you for ages. You are only forgiven if you (continue) to share the fruits of your collecting intermission with us. On that note, what a come back! A fantastic textile. Beautiful image definitition. Clearly a master weaver and very careful binding of the ikat. Does the black background make the piece zing even more than usual by intensifying the dark colours? It seems that the threads are more closely packed than usual as if the weaver does not need the latitude of looser threads to line up the pattern.

Many thanks for sharing...
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susan stem wrote:
Thank you so much John for remembering us and sharing such an exquisite example of a rare textile. It's a beauty! Would you be so kind as to tell us a little about it. I know what these are, but some of our readers may not be so fortunate. For instance, 'wayang' are the shadow puppets that are ubiquitous throughout Indonesia and Malaysia, but who do the figures on your textile represent? What is the symbolism of the four-pointed star in the middle and on the edges? And what was this particular piece used for? It's a rich textile, full of symbolism and ritual importance. Terimakasih!


Attachments:
File comment: The wayang geringsing
wayang_geringsing_w.jpg
wayang_geringsing_w.jpg [ 60.19 KiB | Viewed 12107 times ]
File comment: Temple shown in the "star" in the geringsing.
temple_w.jpg
temple_w.jpg [ 67.45 KiB | Viewed 12107 times ]
File comment: Stone temple carving. The seated woman's posture is similar to the right hand figure in the panel. That is the hardest one to "see" at first.
geringsing_w.jpg
geringsing_w.jpg [ 65.53 KiB | Viewed 12107 times ]
File comment: stone temple carving similar to the left two figures in the panel.
geringsing_008_w.jpg
geringsing_008_w.jpg [ 62.77 KiB | Viewed 12107 times ]
File comment: There are three figures. The one on the right has her head turned over her left shoulder. They are copies of stone carvings.
panel_of_figures_w.jpg
panel_of_figures_w.jpg [ 58.65 KiB | Viewed 12107 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 6:07 pm 
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These are the old book pictures of women with their long nails ikating and weaving. They didn't seem to post last time. [that is because there is a maximum of 5 attachments per post on the forum - Pamela]

-John


Attachments:
File comment: long nails facilitated adjusting the threads.
weaving_109w.jpg
weaving_109w.jpg [ 62.22 KiB | Viewed 12101 times ]
File comment: wrapping resist ties.
ikating_w.jpg
ikating_w.jpg [ 61.29 KiB | Viewed 12101 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 6:30 pm 
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John

You have definitely been away from the forum too long! You have forgotten that the max pix width should be no more than 600 as it distorts the forum. I seem to remember this as something you used to 'challenge' us with before!

I will resize the photos and and re-attach. Not sure if I can get a sensible order. At the moment, because of the distortion I can't see all the print or all the photos on my screen without scrolling - and I have a wide screen computer - so can't even work out what would be a sensible order!

best

[I would commend to you the 'sticky' post at the top of this General section of the forum which outlines max width and also max file size for image http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... .php?t=178 ]

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