tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Mon Oct 23, 2017 1:31 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Rungus 'tapi'
PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 7:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 7:35 pm
Posts: 175
Location: east coast
Thanks again Pamela for the information. I apologize if some of my questions are a bit on the naive side but I am still learning with a long way to go.

If this is our "jacket" thread? I am posting a couple more that might be be of interest.

The first is of a childs's vest from the plains Indians of the US. Also probably early 20th century. I'm more of a basket and pot collector but bought this about 10 -15 years ago at auction because I also like beadwork. The flag symbols were common in the early part of the 20th century. Note also the French Fleur-de-lis. The French nuns taught the Indians how to do bead work so much of it shows strong French motifs as a result. Much like Indonesian Batik shows European bouquets, etc.

And to seque back to the Pacific work, I am posting two shell work jackets.

One was never cleaned before I got it. Not sure if the other ever was. I only had a shot of the back of the "dirty" one at this time. The jacket has a bark cloth interior lining. Somewhat unusual?

I am also posting front and back of what is likely a newer Iban jacket. Mid 20th century or perhaps earlier. It is interesting for its cleverly not quite symmetric symmetry.

A great book on Iban designs is: Basic Iban Design. Augustine Anggat Ganjing. Percetakan Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. Ministry of Education. Kuala Lumpur. 2001.

Are we building to the point where we can have an on-line "exhibition" of things as a museum does? With all the jackets, skirts, baskets, hats, etc., our forum members must have, there must be suitable and sufficient materials?

More work for Pamela.

Is there some easy way to switch the attachment order so as to follow the narration order? I note that the last in is the first out.

-John



Pamela wrote:
John.

The Rungus tube skirt is called a tapi. See my text which is quoted from the Sabah costume book. The motifs are ones they talk about in typical tapis and not necessarily in mine.
Quote:
In 'An Introducation to the Traditional Costumes of Sabah' edited by Rita Lasimbang and Stella Moo-Tan, page 89 it refers to the tapi Tube-skirt falling below the knees [Priestesses wear a tapi with heavy brass bells at the hem to accompany the chants] The floating weft motifs in the horizontal bands comprise an astonishing range of subjects. There is a fern motif, vegetable seeds, a drunken woman and a pattern derived from the body of a black bird. Worn during festival or ceremonies.'

I don't know the age of my tapis and would loosely say '2nd half of 20th century' but I have nothing to gauge it by. There are photos in the Sabah book (and on postcards) of similar tapis but I have not seen any others with a known date to see, handle and compare. It appears to have absolutely no modern threads and is hand stitched together. If 'an expert' or the owner had said that the tapi was early 20th century the 'feel' and look of the tapi would not disagree with this attestation. However, failing that, I am cautious!

Just as background the Sabah costume book (page 75) says of the Rungus:
Quote:
'The Rungus is a sub-group of the Dusun/Kadazan group found mainly on the Kudat and Bengkoka peninsula in the northern part of Sabah. According to the 1981 census, the Rungus number about 40,000.

They are sedentary farmers as well as shifting cultivators. Their staple food is rice and maize. They are skilled in producaing homespun cloth made from cotton - kapok, for their costumes. They also produce handicrafts made from a variety of materials, bead necklaces and other accessories.'


Attachments:
File comment: Front of an Iban shellwork jacket.
Probably early - mid 20th century.

shell jacket front.jpg
shell jacket front.jpg [ 110.27 KiB | Viewed 13139 times ]
File comment: Back of an Iban shellwork jacket. Note the subtle nonsymmetry.
shell jacket back.jpg
shell jacket back.jpg [ 118.63 KiB | Viewed 13139 times ]
File comment: Back of an old Iban jacket. The lining is of bark cloth. The buri shells are quite dirty.
Iban shell jacket back.jpg
Iban shell jacket back.jpg [ 89.17 KiB | Viewed 13139 times ]
File comment: Back of the child's beaded leather vest of the US plains Indians. Peacock is definitely French because they were not found in the US plains.
child beaded vest back.jpg
child beaded vest back.jpg [ 133.24 KiB | Viewed 13139 times ]
File comment: Front of a child's beaded leather vest from the Plains Indians in US. The US flag was a common motif. Note also the French influence.

Early to mid 20th century.

child beaded vest front .jpg
child beaded vest front .jpg [ 148.58 KiB | Viewed 13139 times ]

_________________
John
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Iban Kelambi
PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 10:08 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
John

I have split off your jacket post to start a new jacket thread.

Here is my addition of an Iban (I think) Kelambi which is quite a favourite item in my collection. It is certainly not the sharp chemical dyes which find a place in my heart but the back of the kelambi which has been created with such naive aplomb and disregard for accuracy. The bottom of the back panel has been created by needle weaving. It is interesting that the writing on the front panels all appears upside down and is, presumably, just a form of decoration. It is unlined and I believe it is cotton.

I found the jacket hiding amongst beachwear in one of the shops of Tanjung Aru Resort in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, East Malaysia. I could not believe my eyes when I found it.

I have no idea of its age - obviously 20th century. I don't know whether the shape of the planes indicate the age or whether it is a restriction of the technique - the latter I think! I would love to have seen it being worn by the person for whom it was originally made.


Attachments:
File comment: Back of Kalambi. Length from shoulder to bottom of kalambi 49 cm, width across back 47.5 cm
Borneo-(83).jpg
Borneo-(83).jpg [ 64.92 KiB | Viewed 13129 times ]
File comment: Front of Kalambi
Borneo-(76).jpg
Borneo-(76).jpg [ 53.55 KiB | Viewed 13129 times ]
File comment: Detail of Kalambi
Borneo-(88).jpg
Borneo-(88).jpg [ 52.07 KiB | Viewed 13129 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Q & A
PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 10:18 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Quote:
Are we building to the point where we can have an on-line "exhibition" of things as a museum does? With all the jackets, skirts, baskets, hats, etc., our forum members must have, there must be suitable and sufficient materials?

More work for Pamela.


Yes, this is possible and I will put together some web galleries trying to put like with like i.e. Iban with Iban etc. However, I am completely swamped and drowning at work and currently quite a lot on at home so I am not able to pull this together for a while however much I might wish to do so.

Quote:
Is there some easy way to switch the attachment order so as to follow the narration order? I note that the last in is the first out.


No I have not found a way but I deliberately post photos in reverse order knowing that the last will appear immediately under the text. I sometimes end up deleting and starting again. Gets to be a challenge if I am exercising administrator functions to reduce image size and re-post. By the way, John, please try to keep your file size a bit smaller (50-60k) as for some people without the benefit of fast broadband it takes ages for the images to load. (That includes me at home and I know it affects some of our members around the world.) Sorry to nag!

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Iban Kelambi
PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 6:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 7:35 pm
Posts: 175
Location: east coast
Pamela-

You certainly find the most interesting pieces. Great find. But couldn't quite tell from your note if you like or dislike sharp chemical dyes? Most of the tribal people I know of went wild over chemical dyes. And so did the Victorians when they could get bright colored paints, etc., cheaply. I understand that making the natural indigo dyes for the Iban was a very smelly process because of the fermentation required. And that's not even including the time involved and nearly permanent skin staining.

I think you are correct that the letters on your kelambi are just decorative particularly when some in the smallest row are backwards and/or upside down. Edric Ong's book PUA has several pua in the back which also have modern military symbols of aircraft, rifles, heliocopters etc. I think the aircraft were just as stylized but with simple propellers, much like we used to drawn when I was a young lad. The white one looks as though it has a propeller as well. Do the figures seated on the planes suggest passengers?

I assume this is sungkit weaving? Same on inside?. The badge on the lower back is more or less traditional with the Iban. I have posted a couple more of my Iban jackets showing the badge as well. The badge is in the "split" needlework style where there are splits along the warp because of the way the supplementry wefts are returned around them. Is yours like that as well?

I assume your jacket is also Iban from the Sabah area?


I am also posting a man's jacket which is in sungkit technique and on red commercial cloth as well.

Can't wait to see more of your pieces.

-John




Pamela wrote:
John

I have split off your jacket post to start a new jacket thread.

Here is my addition of an Iban (I think) Kelambi which is quite a favourite item in my collection. It is certainly not the sharp chemical dyes which find a place in my heart but the back of the kelambi which has been created with such naive aplomb and disregard for accuracy. The bottom of the back panel has been created by needle weaving. It is interesting that the writing on the front panels all appears upside down and is, presumably, just a form of decoration. It is unlined and I believe it is cotton.

I found the jacket hiding amongst beachwear in one of the shops of Tanjung Aru Resort in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, East Malaysia. I could not believe my eyes when I found it.

I have no idea of its age - obviously 20th century. I don't know whether the shape of the planes indicate the age or whether it is a restriction of the technique - the latter I think! I would love to have seen it being worn by the person for whom it was originally made.


Attachments:
File comment: Man's kalambi in sungkit technique on commercial red cloth.
jacket 1.jpg
jacket 1.jpg [ 129.85 KiB | Viewed 13105 times ]
File comment: closeup of the badge section of the kalambi
jacket  2 badge.jpg
jacket 2 badge.jpg [ 102.93 KiB | Viewed 13105 times ]
File comment: Iban ikatted kalambi showing the back view. All handspun threads.
kalambi 1 back.jpg
kalambi 1 back.jpg [ 122.46 KiB | Viewed 13105 times ]

_________________
John
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 9:28 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Sorry, John, my British way of speaking. I don't like bright chemical colours and red, yellow and green together are probably my least favourite combination. I enjoy mellow browns and softer natural dyes and am naturally attracted to them. I would choose to wear such colours, decorate with them and find I can't help an affinity with those colours in textiles generally.

I don't know whether the kelambi is local to Sabah or not - only that I found it there. As it was totally out of context with the shop it was even more suprising. I went into the shop again the following year and they dismissed out of hand that they might have anything similar in stock.

Interesting that the book 'An Introduction to the Traditional Costumes of Sabah' does not list Iban at all which would suggest that they are not normally found within that State, at least in any great numbers. 7 different ethnic groups are mentioned although the Preface refers to 50 ethnic groups being found in Sabah.

Is it sungkit? Well it is the oddest supplementary weft I have ever seen if it is. I have never seen anything quite like it. The decoration is similar on both sides of the background red woven cloth. It looks to me as if it has been applied by a needle - see enlarged detail below.


Attachments:
File comment: detail of supplementary thread technique used on main body of kalambi
Borneo-(82)w.jpg
Borneo-(82)w.jpg [ 53.49 KiB | Viewed 13089 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group