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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:27 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
Posts: 22
Location: sydney
re Ann Goodman's tampan and various comments.

Ann - it isnt from Kroe, now Krui. Most likely from Komering which is not coastal at all and where large central animal figures seem to have been popular. The few tampan genuinely from the Krui area are very crude or not supplementary weft at all. Its a beautiful piece & full of mystery - unusually large. Ive seen many with similar structure: paired animals either side of central post with platform, more paired animals and one large central animal. Mac's recent posting could be a simplified version. Larry's comments help to explain why no two tampan are identical.

Chris B notes a long strip of tampan illustrated by Mattiebelle Gittinger. I have one of these and although the designs are paired back to back, they are not identical, so they werent using pattern sticks. Ive been told they were used as walkways for the bride and groom to walk to where they sat in state on a pile of cushions. They werent used to cover food & had a single function so therefore kept in better condition and newer looking? They always seem to be this Kota Agung-Liwa style. But this area was sheltered from the eruption of Krakatau so production may have ceased later, as also in Komering. Furthermore some Kota Agung tatibin and palepai have strange pinks and greens which suggest production later than 1883 - perhaps up to 1920?

Chris


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:51 am 
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Location: Japan
Chris, If a tampan is not supplementary weft at all what method might have been used to pattern it?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 4:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 2:41 pm
Posts: 36
Location: London, UK
The identification of the iconography on tampan and palepai is proving a most interesting thread!

I wish to respond to the suggestion that the figure on the lower right of the textile posted by Chris Reid is a man with a bird on his head. As we are all aware, the Minang wear headdresses which have an enlarged shape of various different kinds see Walk in Splendor, Summerfield and Summerfield.

It would seem illogical to me that any human figure in South Sumatra would be depicted with any animal on their head, especially as according to both adat and Islam the head is a sacred place and not somewhere to be touched by anything other than a cloth. If you refer to the publication Wearing Wealth and Styling Identity: Tapis from Lamung, South Sumatra, Totton, M-L, the many old photographs of men and women do show the female wearing a large siger headdress which protudes horizontally on each side of the head, for example see pages 118 & 145. The men on the other hand wear a songket headcloth neatly wrapped around the head. I have yet to see any old photographs of a male figure in either Minangkabau or in Lampung with a wide type of headdress such as that depicted in this tampan, and as the figure is not shown wearing a cloth appropriate for a female figure, it is not representing a women ... so perhaps it was a simple mistake by the weaver and she forgot to properly dress her female image! Or perhaps this figure with a different dress in a military or naval figure ...?

I just feel this cannot represent a bird perched on a head! Are there any other suggestions from Forum members? This remains an open and interesting thread!

Lesley

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Lesley Pullen, London


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 1:30 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
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Location: sydney
I agree Lesley. I think the images of figures of humans or birds just got squashed together in the corner.

Mac - heres a non supplementary weft tampan, probably made by Serawai or Kaur people in Krui. Krui used to be part of Bengkulu province, where most of these people live.


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small photo serawai or kaur tampan.JPG
small photo serawai or kaur tampan.JPG [ 194.37 KiB | Viewed 3027 times ]
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 10:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
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Location: sydney
The writing on the coastal malay style tampan I just posted is:

Selamat doedoek injtjik dan toean injtjik nan diwa indradjati silakan doedoek sarta makan ambil coe

My wife Safrina is from Lampung and translates this as:

Happy sitting aunt and uncle, who are 'diwa indradjati' [= respectful title], please sit down and eat cake.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:41 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Chris (and Safrina)

Thank you so much for this! I realise there will be cultural differences but the words really brought this little textile to life for me. In my family, afternoon tea (including cake) was always an important social time both between close family and with wider guests e.g. Devonshire clotted cream with home baked scones when the Vicar came to tea! For my mother's funeral I scheduled it so that the 'wake' afterwards could be an afternoon tea as this seemed such a suitable social event for our family - and I made sure that some of her particularly favourite cakes were set out on the food table. In a different setting these could have had a protective covering of just such a tampan!!!

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:37 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
Posts: 22
Location: sydney
Thanks for the comments Pamela

at risk of seriously going off subject (the ostentatious palepai) here's another of these curious pieces from the west coast of southern Sumatra. This one was bought from a woman in Krui who inherited it from her grandmother from Bengkulu.

The outer ring is: anak tjina berpajoeng sitin soedah sitin sekelat poela saja hina laloe miskin soedah miskin melarat poela slamat pakai

and the inner ring is: la illah ha illaullah mohamed rasululah (there is no god but Allah and Mohamed is his messanger).

The outer translates as (thanks to my wife Safrina, and Hweifen Cheah in Sydney): [A?] chinese child [in context a girl] with [or has?] satin umbrella as well as satin exotic shiny cloth. I’m humble therefore poor, already poor, destitute as well. Happy use.

It doesnt make a lot of sense. Is the Malay maker complaining about the Chinese?

Chris


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krui or bengkulu tampan.JPG
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