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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:53 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:24 pm
Posts: 30
Location: California
Hello all,
My family and I had the opportunity to spend a few days recently with my dear T'boli friends in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, Mindanao. While Lang Dulay has become somewhat of a celebrity over the last several years, it was so unique and wonderful to spend some time with her and the other weavers. She happily got down on the floor and did a bit of weaving for us. Along with some amazing memories, we were able to come away with some absolutely priceless treasures including several pieces from Lola's (we call her Lola) personal collection; a nice malong, a beautiful kegal nisif (embroidered blouse), swat (haircomb), brass belt and of course some lovely rolls of t'nalak personally woven by Lola - which is a rarity at this point.

I've attached a few photos. South Cotabato is a strange and beautiful place and the T'boli people are so very special in so many ways. I treasure them.

I am guessing many of you have visited the Lake Sebu area before. If so, maybe you can share a bit about your experience or show some of the beautiful textiles you seen or acquired there. Thanks in advance.

Best,
Craig


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2013 8:57 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Hi Craig

Many thanks for telling us about your visit to your T'boli friends who live around Lake Sebu and sharing your photos. I am very attracted to T'nlak and am fortunate to have a role as well as the beautiful book: 'Dreamweavers' which has such stunning photos of T'nlak that the wonderful ikat just seems to be touchable on the page! (Info on the book at http://www.tribaltextiles.info/bibliogr ... _books.htm )

There are several threads on the forum with info and photos on the T'boli and T'nlak - I recommend using the Search function (button in top left of screen available whether you are logged in or not) and search for the terms. However, I definitely support Craig in his request for members to share any stories and/or photos of their travels to the Lake Sebu area AND any textiles from there!

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 17, 2013 11:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:24 pm
Posts: 30
Location: California
Hello,

Here is a look at a nice full roll of t'nalak. This role originates from the Henry Otley Beyer collection. Most likely woven in the mid 20th century. While not exactly cared for properly for many years, it did remain rolled up. It's dyes have only faded slightly and it retains a relatively nice sheen. I hope you like it.

Craig


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T'nalakGH4.jpg
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 2:11 am 
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Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:24 pm
Posts: 30
Location: California
Hello,

Attached are photos of another roll of t'nalak I was recently able to add to my collection. This t'nalak was originally obtained in 1968 by the gentleman I purchased it from. After all these years, the sheen is excellent, the dyes are still fresh and the pattern is sharp. It is noticeably softer and more pliable than most t'nalak and abaca I have touched. Very pleasing. My dear T'boli friend says this softness is usually attributed to a process called "tenena" which involves soaking the dyed but unwoven fibers in "loho" or lime for 36 hours before weaving. Enjoy.

Best,
Craig


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 4:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2003 6:34 pm
Posts: 393
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Thank you Craig for sharing photos of these handsome textiles. I am quite attracted to these and find your examples to be very beautiful, with crisp, graphic patterning and balanced use of colors. And it's especially interesting to see photos of the people there. Hopefully, others on the forum will have T'boli/t'nalak photos to share too.

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Susan Stem

http://www.tribaltrappings.com
http://tribaltrappings.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I have just posted information supplied via Chris Reid of 8 "Weavers’ Stories from Island Southeast Asia" available at the Fowler Museum, UCLA website. The post may be accessed here: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2433

The last of these videos features Lang Dulay whom Craig had the privilege of visiting - see his posts at the top of this thread. I am going to see if I can embed that video here:

phpBB [video]


The information from the Fowler Museum website about this particular video is:
Quote:
Lang Dúlay was already a young mother at the time of the Japanese Occupation during World War II. Through those turbulent years, she wove t’nálak cloth made from a fine variety of abacá that grew in the highlands of Southern Mindanao. A long lifetime of weaving has earned her a reputation as a master in her community. In 1998 she was awarded the Philippine national prize for traditional artists (Gáwad Manlilikhá ng Báyan). Since then, she has traveled many times to Manila and also as far as Washington, D.C., where she was a participating artist at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Although she can neither read nor write, Mrs. Dúlay maintains a bank account into which her lifetime stipend is deposited every month. She has used some of this funding to found and run a school for T’bóli weaving next to her home

Beh (esteemed grandmother) Lang, as she is fondly called, cuts a familiar figure in her community when she takes time out to visit one of her many grandchildren, perched on the back of a taxi-motorcycle with the key to her safe hanging around her neck. She is proudest of her role as grandmother to an entire village, including many youngsters she has put through school. Now in her eighties, she no longer sits at the loom, as that is a task she gives to her senior students, but she has not stopped teaching and she continues to dream—the source of many of the ikat patterns that she still ties and dyes herself.

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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