tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Thu Oct 19, 2017 12:49 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Burmese Luntaya Achiek
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 4:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2012 3:06 am
Posts: 5
Location: Malaysia
My interest is collecting Chinese porcelain and ancient beads. I am totally new in collecting old textiles. This is my first post at your forum.

Please find attached herewith 4 images of my first Burmese textile.

Any comments are most appreciated.

Thank you.

Lee


Attachments:
dscn1330w.jpg
dscn1330w.jpg [ 95.36 KiB | Viewed 5595 times ]
dscn1327w.jpg
dscn1327w.jpg [ 107.98 KiB | Viewed 5595 times ]
dscn1333w.jpg
dscn1333w.jpg [ 99.54 KiB | Viewed 5595 times ]
dscn1332w.jpg
dscn1332w.jpg [ 111.23 KiB | Viewed 5600 times ]


Last edited by Lee on Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:15 am, edited 2 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 9:47 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Hi Lee

Welcome to the forum and the joys of collecting textiles. Be warned! It can become a dangerous passion!

A very nice skirt cloth of luntaya acheik. This luntaya acheik woven silk textile was and still is woven in the Amarapura area on, as Slyvia Fraser-Lu says in her article 'Burman textiles' in 'Textiles from Burma' edited by Elizabeth Dell & Sandra Dudley, published by The James Henry Green Centre for World Art in 2003, ISBN 1-58886-067-1:
Quote:
"... a traditional Thai-Burman loom in an interlocking tapestry weave by pairs of girls who painstakingly manipulate 100-200 small shuttles back and forth in turn through a warp of over 1,500 threads. The distinctive wave like cable designs sometimes include floral appendages and are often in striking trompe l'oeil colour combinations (Fig.4.2.iii, Fig 4.2.iv). The Burmans credit the introduction of the tapestry weaving technique to captive weavers from Manipur in the late eighteenth century. So highly prized was luntaya acheik that its patterns offered inspiration to textile producers in other parts of Burma. Weavers in Arakan on the west coast and Gangaw in central Burma began to integrate acheik elements into their traditional supplementary weft-patterned fabrics, as did the weavers of ikat at Inle Lake, Kyi-thei near Prome and Thabyei Auk in the Mandalay area (Fig.4.2.iv)."

Very difficult to estimate the age of your textile. I saw similar fabric being woven in those colours in the Amarapura area in 1998. I will look at my photos of some of the cloth being woven.

I edited the size of your photos and reposted as such wide ones distort the reading of the thread. I also deleted your first duplicate post from the private 'Uploading images.....' section of the forum.

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 10:11 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I have had a look at my 1998 diary from my visit to Myanmar. The section on Amarapura http://www.tribaltextiles.info/Diaries/ ... #Amarapura refers to weaving and I attach a few photos of the girls - currently in training at a government training college.

The textile is woven with the reverse side of the fabric facing the weavers. A protective cloth is laid over the section of already woven cloth on which the very many shuttles are carefully laid out ready for the tapestry weaving.


Attachments:
File comment: a piece of luntaya acheik being woven at a government training college in the Amarapura area 1998
9809c16w.jpg
9809c16w.jpg [ 86.05 KiB | Viewed 5580 times ]
File comment: the underside of a piece of luntaya acheik being woven at a government training college in the Amarapura area 1998
9809c17w.jpg
9809c17w.jpg [ 77.24 KiB | Viewed 5580 times ]
File comment: girls training in weaving luntaya acheik at a government training college in the Amarapura area 1998
9809c18w.jpg
9809c18w.jpg [ 83.35 KiB | Viewed 5580 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2012 3:06 am
Posts: 5
Location: Malaysia
Dear Pamela

Thank you very much for editing the images (sorry for any inconvenience caused) and also your comments with images from your visit to Myanmar in 1998.

Indeed it is dangerous and an expensive passion!

Additional information relating to this Burmese Luntaya Achiek.

2 pieces stitched together with some decorated motif appeared like silver thread. Refer to image no. 4

Found with minor damaged/stained/discolored.

Lee


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Pamela and lee.
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 10:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:42 am
Posts: 19
Location: Honolulu Hawaii
I have never seen Burmese Luntaya Achiek from 19 century or older with only vegetable dyes. It that mean that this Tapestry woven fabrics are all 20 century ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2012 3:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2003 6:34 pm
Posts: 393
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Lee and Effi-
There are examples of luntaya acheik made with natural dyes from the 19thc. You may have not seen any because they are rare and quite expensive. There may be some examples in museums, tho I do not know personally of any. I have been lucky to see some in private collections, and I believe someone posted one on the forum a few years ago (found it: http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=348&highlight=luntaya+acheik); evidently one or two are shown in the book cited on that thread. Most of what we do see available is 20th c. and not natural dyes, but it doesn't mean there weren't any with natural dyes from the 19thc.

_________________
Susan Stem

http://www.tribaltrappings.com
http://tribaltrappings.blogspot.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2012 2:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:42 am
Posts: 19
Location: Honolulu Hawaii
Thanks Susan

I just saw this textile looks like a great early textile. from ( The Tilleke & Gibbins Textile Collection, 2003.9.1 ) web site . Here is the link to their web site.

http://www.tilleke.com/firm/community/textiles

Amarapura, Myanmar

Mid 19th century


Attachments:
Textile_male_hip_wrapper_0[1].jpg
Textile_male_hip_wrapper_0[1].jpg [ 147.99 KiB | Viewed 5512 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:22 am
Posts: 65
Location: germany
Lee and Effi, and others,

Susan refers to a book on the link she posted:
An illustrated Book of Burmese Court Textiles.

Both Seriol Richards and I mentioned it. It is lavishly illustrated with pieces described (earliest) "Burmese court textile in the Shan style from the early 19th century."
That could be clever wording: textile or Shan style from back then?
But I doubt it, the next date is "Shan textile from the mid 19th century."
The book also has photos from the 1870s of people wearing luntaya-acheiq. and one of a mural dated 1596 in Wat Phumin, Thailand, that shows two persons wearing cloth with wavy lines, which must have been created in a very similar technique.
The book points out that the popularity of luntaya-acheiq increased towards the end of the 19th c. Personally, I would attribute that the British colonial rule and decline of possible prohibition of use by others than nobles, perhaps also increased affluence allowing lessers to afford the expensive textiles.
The book also has a chapter on natural dyes, the author pointing out that vibrant colors could be achieved with them, but does mention synthetic dyes..
The modern luntaya-acheiq one can find in several shops in Rangoon are recognizably not as fine as the older ones, but those produced by the training college in Amarapura could well be of better quality.
I wouldn't venture a opinion about Lee's piece, other than saying that I would have been very tempted to buy.

Get the book and feast your eyes.

Larry


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:51 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I can see the book at available at a couple of Amazon sites as well as other on-line retailers...

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group