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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 1:16 am 
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..and one more "Yi" item. This cape is said to have been made by Yi people in Yunnan, though I have not had the opportunity to check this information. It is made of a heavyweight fabric with a floppy handle, probably either hemp or ramie, with some wool embroidered decoration. The wool tends to suggest that this was made by people living higher up on the mountainsides.

I have seen several capes like this: the "stepped" cut at the lower edge and the pleats seem to be the distinctive features. I wonder if these were the prototypes for the "shamans"/"funeral" capes shown in other posts?


Attachments:
File comment: cape, said to be made by Yi people in Yunnan province
CET273-1.jpg
CET273-1.jpg [ 179.13 KiB | Viewed 5832 times ]
File comment: the back of the cape
CET273-3.jpg
CET273-3.jpg [ 113.78 KiB | Viewed 5832 times ]
File comment: detail of wool embroidery around the collar
CET273-2.jpg
CET273-2.jpg [ 149.22 KiB | Viewed 5832 times ]

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:18 am 
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Hi Chris

I find this style of garment stunning! I remembered that there was a whole thread jumping off from this style - but, what a hunt to find it as the search engine cannot cope with just 'Yi' ..... but I did!!! http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... php?t=1056 It also contains a link to another Yi thread with similar textile.

Re your previous post - "Malipo Yi/Flowery Lolo" - Martin has found a lovely photo gallery of photos of Tianpeng Market taken by Ludwig Max Brinckmann which includes the clothes being worn...now, get your 'eye in' to spot them...! https://plus.google.com/photos/11332723 ... banner=pwa

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:41 am 
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great that you found those earlier cape postings Pamela, that thread is very informative.

...and that photo gallery absolutely nails the "Flowery Lolo" jackets! Tianpeng area in Yunnan!

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:34 pm 
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Out of interest I put 'Tianpeng area in Yunnan' into Google and it brought up http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/tianpeng/ with, I think, the same group of photos! I think the text intro is right to the point of our earlier discussion about the Yi/Lolo in both Yunnan and Vietnam:
Quote:
Tianpeng 田蓬 right on the Vietnamese border in Funing county has one of the best varieties of ethnic minorities in Yunnan: many Miao, two groups of Yao, Yi, Zhuang, plus some people who come over from Vietnam......

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:39 am 
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Thank you to all who have been contributing to this thread- I've found it very interesting. Regarding Rachel's question about the difference in the two textiles from the same general area, it is a conundrum that will probably not be answered until more research and writing is done on the various subgroups of the Yi peoples. These may not both be from the Hualao people- if my understanding of Wu-zhh's presentation is correct, the term "Longpo Yi" refers to the garment, not an ethnic group. Plus he did not say where the second example came from. These pieces are not even shown in the Chinese book "The Costumes and Adornments of Chinese Yi Nationality Picture Album", which makes the Yi appear to be a single cohesive ethnic group with different regional 'styles' based on location. They ignore the subgroups, and pertinent to this thread, do not even mention Malipo County as a place.

I also had one of the examples with the plaid body and very graphic black and white appliqued designs. I do find it strange that these are considered older than the patchwork garments, as they seem to have little wear by comparison. (photos below)

Also, regarding the Lolo outfits shown, there are examples that have overtones of the patchwork on the ritual garments- I saw the set below in a private collection in Kaili and have included it below to compare to the others shown.

I will say that one subgroup that has been researched, and was the subject of an exhibition at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Washington in 2000, is the Nuoso. The catalog is titled Mountain Patterns and was done by Stevan Harrell, Bamo Qubumo and Ma Erzi.


Attachments:
Mail-Guizhou-textiles16.jpg
Mail-Guizhou-textiles16.jpg [ 335.08 KiB | Viewed 5769 times ]
Yi Cape1.jpg
Yi Cape1.jpg [ 299.68 KiB | Viewed 5769 times ]
Yi Cape2.jpg
Yi Cape2.jpg [ 350.46 KiB | Viewed 5769 times ]
Yi Cape-detail1.jpg
Yi Cape-detail1.jpg [ 266.03 KiB | Viewed 5769 times ]
Yi Cape-detail2.jpg
Yi Cape-detail2.jpg [ 247.13 KiB | Viewed 5769 times ]

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 5:32 pm 
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Hi thank you to all. I am so sorry for my late reply. Susan is right, regarding Rachel's question about difference in the two textiles from the same general area, it is a conundrum, but I would say my opinions after indagated and researched carefully:
1. These ritual garments made and used originally by the Hua Luo (Flowery Lo) who are a subgroup of Yi peoples, they live mainly in Mabeng, Yongli, Zhewa village, etc, Malipo county, now also live in Funing (includes Tianpeng town), Guangnan, Xichou county, etc, Yunnan, China;
2. Originally the shape of this garment was stipulated but the ornaments and workmanships were not, so there are two even more styles because of made by different makers;
3. This ritual garment is wore by the druidess who preside and dance in the exequies. She was elected by all villagers then She needed to make a new ritual garment herself and expended about one year;
4. This ritual garment had been diffused some other area of Yi peoples, so there are more styles now;
5. Regarding the depictions of this ritual garment please refer the English book: 'Writing with Thread', and Chinese discourses: 'Research on Primitive Religion Costume of Yunnan Nationalities' http://www.doc88.com/p-801299013056.html 'Stomach Burial and Flowery Lo People's Costume' http://wuxizazhi.cnki.net/Article/HXRW199004032.html etc.

Please excuse me for my bad English. Thanks again.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 10:46 pm 
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Very many thanks for your responses!

Susan, great to see another of the plaid body and black and white appliqué examples - I feel very much still the 'mystery' textile style of this thread. Interesting to see the detail of the strip of wax resist. Great photos of a stunning Lolo set.

Thank you Wu-zhh for coming back to us and sharing your research with us (as well as for starting off what has turned into a fascinating thread).

Earlier I posted the link to a ritual robe from the Yi of Malipo http://www.jossgraham.com/pieces/view/4 ... category:8 I know we can look at the link but I have been in touch with Joss Graham and he has kindly given his permission for me to post the images directly on the thread. Details:
Quote:
SHAMAN'S ROBE - Patchwork on indigo-dyed cotton shaman's 'butterfly' robe, Yi people, Malipo, Yunnan Province, South West China c.1940.
To borrow a phrase that Susan uses sometimes, great 'eye candy'! The patchwork in this example seems to be in extremely good condition. We don't have measurements but, looking at the size of cut-out for the head it must be a very large robe indeed!


Attachments:
File comment: SHAMAN'S ROBE: Patchwork on indigo-dyed cotton shaman's 'butterfly' robe, Yi people, Malipo, Yunnan Province, South West China c.1940
Yi-shaman-2w.jpg
Yi-shaman-2w.jpg [ 96.04 KiB | Viewed 5723 times ]
File comment: SHAMAN'S ROBE: Patchwork on indigo-dyed cotton shaman's 'butterfly' robe, Yi people, Malipo, Yunnan Province, South West China c.1940 - detail
Yi-costume-det.jpg
Yi-costume-det.jpg [ 111.26 KiB | Viewed 5723 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:17 am 
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Thank you Wu-zhh for clarifying that both these unusual garments are in fact from the same subgroup. As Rachel points out, it is still very interesting and surprising that such different imagery and patterning would exist on these ritual textiles. Perhaps one village does one style, and another village the other style? Are you, Wu-zhh in that area? Or could you do some research with this in mind? Thanks much!

I'm including a photo from the same private collection of another of the patchwork style pieces- sorry the photo is not better.


Attachments:
File comment: Yi Ritual Garment in private collection
Mail-Guizhou-textiles18.jpg
Mail-Guizhou-textiles18.jpg [ 179.97 KiB | Viewed 5712 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:35 pm 
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Very interesting thread fellow members. I have once seen a old Yi patchwork tunic specifically with different shades of brown. It was definitely authentic, but I have no more information. I am very fond of the Napo Yi costumes, and appreciate the images posted by Pamela. There are excellent illustration in the Guangxi: Colorful Costumes book.

On a side note, Lolo comes from the Chinese 猡猡 luoluo (second tone) which was a highly pejorative Han Chinese term for the Yi in Sichuan- Yunnan- Guizhou plateau. I mention this not to label anyone as politically incorrect, just because I thought you might find it interesting.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 10:53 am 
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Ann Goodman, whose collection features several Yi items, has been in touch with me and asked me to post the following on her behalf:

Quote:
The Forum's questions and caveats regarding the visually exciting longpo yi on a plaid ground with graphic black and white abstracted flower appliques are very much to the point. I noted that one of the photos of Taipeng Market displays a woman wearing a jacket with bold black and white decoration:

Image

that for me recalls the plaid longpo yis.

In my collection is an apron of unknown provenance (JPG 2) with embroidery similar to the lovely work shown in another Taipeng Market photo, which I surmise is Miao:

Image.

I am mystified by this apron. The painted wax batik on silk displays flowers like the black and white applique designs on the longpo yis. But the embroidered birds seem typically Miao, (Songtau?) and the painted batik birds are similar to those seen on many Bailing Miao quilt covers (JPG4). This argues for a Miao designation. However the old silk ribbon, mitered at the corner, the central indent of the ribbon pattern. and the mitered construction of the apron border visible on the back view of the apron (JPG 5) looks more Yi than Miao. I base these observations on several Yi jackets and aprons in my collection, particularly a Nuosu Yi jacket (JPG 6) with old ribbon bands and a central indent focus suggestive of the indent in the apron, and a Mile Luxi Yi outfit (JPG 7) with old silk ribbon bands. Finally there is an illustration of a Bai outfit (JPG 8 ) (Minority Nationalities Costumes and Ornaments in Yunnan 2002 p. 80 ISBN 978-7-80586-845-5 In Chinese) in which the large embroidered flower appears to be in a stitching technique similar to the flowers in my apron. Another Bai that suggests that my apron is Bai is JPG 9 (Minority Natiionalities Costumes and Ornaments in Yunnan p. 77). Are any Forum readers familiar with an apron of this style to help me decide whether this apron is Miao, particularly Songtau or Hunan, as in Clothings and Ornaments of China's Miao People, pp. 19-29.

I have been in touch with Ludwig Max Brinckmann about the use of his photos on the forum. He is happy for us to do so via links and/or including the image by direct link to the Yunnan Explorer website and has told me how to do so. He does not want us to copy the image and then attach it to the post. I have, therefore, included the two images that Ann refers to within the post. How to do this: right click on the image on the web and copy the URL. In your post click 'image' from the various possibilities above the posting box and then paste in the link then click image again to close the tag i.e. [img]the%20url%20for%20the%20photos[/img]

See the full link to the group of Taipeng Market photos by Ludwig Max Brinckmann.


Attachments:
File comment: JPG 2 - apron of unknown provenance, painted wax batik on silk embroidery
2-Yi-or-Miao-apron-front-w.jpg
2-Yi-or-Miao-apron-front-w.jpg [ 94.77 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 4 -Bailing Miao quilt cover with similar painted batik birds
4-Bailing-Miao-coverlet-w.jpg
4-Bailing-Miao-coverlet-w.jpg [ 96.96 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 5 - mitered construction of the apron border visible on the back view of the apron
5-back-Miao-or-Yi-ap-w.jpg
5-back-Miao-or-Yi-ap-w.jpg [ 91.37 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 6 - Nuosu Yi jacket with old ribbon bands and a central indent focus
6-Nuosu-Yi-w.jpg
6-Nuosu-Yi-w.jpg [ 88.4 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 7 - Mile Luxi Yi outfit with old silk ribbon bands
7Yi-Mile-Luxi-with-w.jpg
7Yi-Mile-Luxi-with-w.jpg [ 87.27 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 8 - Bai outfit - (Minority Nationalities Costumes and Ornaments in Yunnan 2002 p. 80 ISBN 978-7-80586-845-5 In Chinese)
8--Bai-w.jpg
8--Bai-w.jpg [ 73.13 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]
File comment: JPG 9 Bai - (Minority Natiionalities Costumes and Ornaments in Yunnan p. 77)
9-Bai-w.jpg
9-Bai-w.jpg [ 98.68 KiB | Viewed 5527 times ]

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Last edited by Pamela on Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:25 pm 
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Further to the info on posting the images from Ludwig Brinckmann's photo galleries at the bottom of my last post containing Ann Goodman's comments I thought it would be helpful to this thread to post all the very detailed and helpful response which I received from Ludwig as he referred to other photo galleries with further Yi images. See his helpful Yi info and - and what truly stunning images!

Quote:
Hi Pamela,

thank you for your interest in my pictures.

My website for the Yunnan images is yunnanexplorer.com where I host a number of galleries, some of which relate to your particular interest.

I think I have images of all the small Yi groups in the Wenshan area of Yunnan:

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/tianpeng/ (Tianpeng Market, which you have already seen)

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/tiaogong/ (Pictures from a festival of a very small Yi group in Funing county near the border to Guangxi).

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/buckwheat/ (A related Yi group in Malipo county)

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/muxiang/ (Another small Yi group in Funing county, these are the Yi who come to Tianpeng market)

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/slideshows/manlong/ (Hualuo in Xichou county)

I certainly do not mind if you include the images in larger form for illustration purposes on your interesting website. However, I would prefer if you do not copy the images, but instead link to the larger images provided by my website and best also add a link to the particular slideshow an image came from. This will better allow your readers to find related images and information on my website. For example, I think I am the only English-language site that provides the accurate dates for their festivals at http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/calendar/festivals/ (which are automatically updated annually, which those who have blindly copied my festival calendar have not realized).

If you copy the image url (usually by right-clicking on the image) from one of the square thumbnails on the slideshow galleries and then change the /150/ at the end to /640/ you will get a larger image, e.g.

http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/images/al ... 249/3/640/

Simply using this link as the source for your img tag will display the images as if they were hosted by your website itself.

Thank you for asking permission to use the images.

Best regards

Ludwig Brinckmann


The website http://www.yunnanexplorer.com/ is certainly worth exploring especially for anyone thinking of visiting Yunnan. I must add a link to the travel section of the forum.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:40 am 
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Thought I would share a helpful email that came in this morning from Ludwig - referring to the image of the second woman shown within the post containing the comments from Ann Goodman above :
Quote:
Thanks Pamela,

that form of posting my images is great.

The second woman you linked to with the apron is actually - Han Chinese [my 'bold]. I have been to Tianpeng market a few times and I have asked them. It is not totally unusual for traditional Han to wear such aprons or turbans, but the Tianpeng area is special in that very many Han women dress very homogeneously this style.

Hope this helps

Ludwig


I also, as promised in a post above, have included info about the Yunnan Explorer website under travel http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... php?t=2299

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