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PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 10:16 am 
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Hi, recently I could buy this nice textile (wool, 125x125cm). I am not sure if it comes from Kashmir or from Persia. Somebody can give me some hints about place of origin, age etc?
Thank you very much
Michael


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:13 pm 
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Hello, it's a shall from Iran. Thanks for sharing


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 2:33 am 
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Hi Valentin-
Tell us more- where in Iran do they make, or wear, 'shalls' like this? And how would it be worn? The square format seems to lend itself more to a scarf/headcovering. When I was in NE Iran I saw Turkmen women wearing wool challis scarves of this size on their heads. None, however were wearing anything of this design or technique- theirs were of Russian origin and were printed. On our forum Iranian/Persian textiles rarely are discussed, so it would be most helpful to learn more about this. Thank you much.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2010 12:08 pm 
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I saw old shalls with this design, not in wool but silk. Sure the square format is strange, maybe cut...


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 8:31 am 
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Hi Michael,

I agree with Valentin, most probably Iran. All the books I have on Kashmir shawls mention that items in the kani technique were also made in Iran, Kirman and Yazd being named as sources. A book from 2006, "The Kashmiri Shawl - from Jamavar to Paisley (Antique Collectors' Club, ISBN 1-85149-506-1) has a chapter "The Shawl in Persia".
Several illustrations are described "Kirman wool, Punjab for Persian market."

"Royal Persian and Kashmir Brocades", published in Tehran, 1975, is mistitled by today's usage, all about kani items. It lists 12 types of "shale", variously as to source (Kerman, Yazd), pattern (striped, flowers), use, etc.

From my experience and in comparison with illustrations, your piece has a quite elaborate design. It appears to be missing a few stripes on the left of the image above. The whole piece was almost certainly longer. Fragments are often used as covers, backed and with borders (wide or narrow) in similar material (contrasting colors, more fragments) commonly with the narrow strip on the edge of the borders having diagonal, narrow stripes (vertically striped cloth sewn on the bias).

Regards, Larry


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 10:29 am 
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Larry,

Thank you very much for your helpful and informative post.

Best

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 6:51 pm 
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Eagle eyes have pointed out to me that, on page 73 of John Gillows' World Textiles, there is a photo of:
Quote:
"Tapestry-weave cloth with a twill binding system from Kirman in Iran. A similar technique is often used in the manufacture of Kashmir shawls"
I am going to take the liberty of attaching a copy of the photo here as I am sure that John would say 'yes' if I asked him. As he is away on travels at the moment that is going to be a little difficult.


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File comment: p73, 'World Textiles: A visual guide to traditional techniques', John Gillow and Bryan Sentance, Thames & Hudson: "Tapestry-weave cloth with a twill binding system from Kirman in Iran. A similar technique is often used in the manufacture of Kash
p73-WldTextiles.jpg
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2010 2:51 am 
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You beat me to it, Pamela! I was just logging on to post the same attribution!

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Anna


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 2:26 am 
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Good sleuthing everyone! Does anyone have any other Persian woven textiles to post? I for one, would like to learn more about this genre of cloth. What exactly is the 'kani' technique? How do these relate to Kashmiri shawls in terms of technique, materials, age? Just curious.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 4:16 am 
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Here's a link that shows a similar Kermani weaving http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroas ... termeh.htm

The site notes: Stripped Patterns: Termehs with a multi-coloured stripped patterns are associated with Zoroastrian folk designs used for women's pantaloons, as well as with Kermani scarves.

I have an old round silk weaving from Yazd.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:11 pm 
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Anna-
Thank you so much for this fascinating link! I'm enjoying learning about Zoroastrianism as well as textiles. Much food for thought.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 2:13 am 
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Hi Susan:

The Zoroastrians are the Parsi's of India, a community that has an interesting history on the sub-continent as well as an ancient history in Iran.

The Parsi's culture is similar to that of New York's Jews - change Bodwallah to Berkowitz and Bombay to the Bronx, and you'll never know the difference.

This is a well known Parsi novelist - http://www.amazon.com/Rohinton-Mistry/e/B000AQTH1C - nothing whatsoever to do with textiles, but read it and see what I mean.

Enjoy!

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 4:52 pm 
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Hi Susan,
Hmm? I was sure I posted a comment about "kani" technique. Anyway ...
Scroll down this page from Marla Mallett's website:
http://www.marlamallett.com/up-six.htm

"double interlocked discontinuous wefts"
"Kani" is the term for the small sticks on which the colored wefts are wrapped: many many of them in use across the width of a Kashmir "jamawar" (textile in the technique).

The patterned area of a Kashmir shawl is more substantial than the plain field woven of fine wool (not always true pashmini).

The technique is also used in China and Burma, as well as in the Punjab and Iran, probably also elsewhere.

Rarer are Kashmir pieces with single interlocked wefts. These are reversable. On some old pieces, on one side of the textile a ground color of the pattern is over-stitched in another color, so finely done that only a comparison of both sides makes this evident. Yes: WOW!

Regards, Larry


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 6:52 am 
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Thank you so much Larry for clarifying what the 'kani' technique is and where it is used. Funny, but I've never heard of it before, even tho some of my very first textile purchases from almost 40 years ago were Kashmiri cloths using that technique. I'll have to do some excavation and give them a fresh look- I always did find them beautiful in use of color, pattern, and in the fineness and complexity of the weaving.

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