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PostPosted: Sat Mar 13, 2010 9:33 pm 
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I was exchanging emails with Jean Howe of 'Threads of Life' and cheekily took the opportunity to ask her if she or any of her colleagues recognised this textile. Jean kindly came back with:
Quote:
The textile . . we think is from Alor. Our Timorese field staff Willy Daos Kadati who is well versed in NTT textiles says it also looks Alor but the sewing of 4 parts is unlike he has seen, nor are the borders what he has seen. He thinks could be an innovation.

When Lolet is back (away for three weeks) I will ask for him to try to identify as he is another good cultural expert for these areas when it comes to textiles.

I have started having a look through books for textiles from Alor. In 'Handwoven Textiles of South-East Asia' by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, page 208 she has a section on 'Solor-Alor Archipelagos'.
Quote:
"East of Flores lie the Solor and Alor Archipelagos, which have weaving traditions greatly influenced by both Flores and Timor.

The women of the western half of Lomblen, or Lembata, in the Lama Lerup and Ille Api areas, produce distinctive warp ikat from heavy hand-spun cotton in a soft blue and brown dye range. The most important textile is an adat sarong patterned with simple geometric shapes, such as the eight-pointed star, diamond tumpul, hearts, squares, and zig-zags, arranged in bands to make a most sophisticated and tasteful composition. Local phenomena, such as volcanic mountains, stick-like figures with upraised hands, and manta rays, also appear on ikat (Fig.259). Two to three lengths of cloth are required to make the tubular sarong, which is rarely worn but serves as part of the marriage gift exchange. This textile traditionally became the property of the husband and might even be buried with him."

My edition of the book is the paperback edition of 1989. ISBN 0-19588954 1. I am not sure if it has been reprinted or there are copies around. I find I quite often come back to it for its weaving focus.

If/when I hear anything more from Jean when Lolet returns I will share it with the forum.


Attachments:
File comment: Fig 259 from page 208 of 'Handwoven Textiles of South-East Asia' by Sylvia Fraser-Lu: An adat sarong from Lomblen depicting volcanoes, stick-like figures, land manta rays. Arts of Asia Gallery, Denpasar.
fig259p208FraserLu.jpg
fig259p208FraserLu.jpg [ 103.17 KiB | Viewed 10751 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:46 pm 
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Location: Denver
Well, what fun this has been! My textile has travelled over what seems to be half the world so far. I really appreciate everyone's input and look forward to any further discussion. Jean Howe's response is very interesting and I'm very interested to hear what she may have to add in the near future. I'm also interested to hear what MAC will have to contribute when he returns. Thanks especially Pamela for your efforts in keeping this thread alive. Cheers

Warren


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 Post subject: The Isinai Textile
PostPosted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 3:03 am 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Greetings all from Kansas!!! Indeed it has been interesting to read the many responses and ideas about Warren's textile. I was hoping we might hear something from Eric Anderson but it seems he doesn't follow the forum these days. When I saw Warren's textile I thought right away of the two Isinai blankets that I mentioned in my first post as well as the two that I have. Isinai blankets are so rare that these were the only four I had seen. I thought someone in the Banaue area of Ifugao, where an attempt to revive the ikat technique has been under way for some years, had seen the book People and Art of the Philippines and was trying to copy the Isinai blanket in it.

After checking the two pieces in the books and getting out my two and then looking again at Warren's piece, I am almost certain that what he has is an Isinai blanket. Sylvia says in her book that Isinai blankets were highly prized and traded to other tribes and even copied by other tribes. I don't know where she got her info but I would think that if the Isinai were producing blankets for trade to other tribes and if they were so highly prized and copied, there should be more of them around. If they were used as funeral blankets and buried with the dead this may explain their rarity.

I have been to the islands of N.T.T. , Solor, Adonara, Lembata, Pantar, and Alor several times and have dozens of textiles from each of these islands. They are almost all tubular skirts used in the wedding exchange and I don't remember seeing any large blankets on the scale of double bed size in four panels such as Warren's piece so I think we can rule out Alor or Lembata. The only textiles I have seen which are very similar to Warren's are the Isinai blankets. When I get back to Japan I will photo and post my two pieces to compare. I did find listed on a University of Nebraska site an Isinai blanket but access was restricted to students etc.. I emailed asking how I might get permission to view that textile but have had no response. Anyone with U. of N. connections?

The book The Philippines Past and Present, written by the American Minister of the Interior for the Philippines, in 1913, details his three trips through the northern mountains of the Philippines prior to 1908. He was quite interested in surveying all of the tribes of the Philippines and lists them all. His list and 900 plus page book makes no mention of the Isinai tribe however. The mystery tribe, the mystery textile!!!

Best regards till later, MAC


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 9:47 am
Posts: 47
Location: Bali Indonesia
It's Sumba. Kodi area. But a real, real oddball.

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www.macan-tidur-textiles.com
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 Post subject: Kodi Textiles
PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2010 5:32 pm 
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Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Susi, I wonder if you have ever seen a Kodi textile that was composed of 4 narrow panels with 4 vertical, red stripes? I haven't had mine out for a while but I seem to remember that they were two, rather wide panels and had only two vertical stripes, I think in yellow commercial thread, near the outer edges. I seem to remember seeing Mamuli (earring) motifs in a piece or two but generally Kodi textiles have diamond and other geometric motifs. I don't remember ever seeing one with figures of crocs, humans etc. like those in Warren's textile. I got my pieces when I visited Kodi in the 70s.

Now that I am back in Japan I will try to get my two Isinai blankets, from northern Luzon in the Philippines,out and photographed to compare.

Do you collect textiles from the Philippines or other countries besides Indonesia? I was told on Roti that Rotinese had migrated to Madagascar. You wouldn't happen to have any textiles from there would you? You wouldn't have any access to Nabraska University would you? They list an Isinai textile but access was restricted and I couldn't get a look at it.

All of the ideas about Warren's textile have been interesting and the search goes on. Is there anyone else out there who collects Philippine textiles or who has an Isinai textile?

Best Regards, MAC


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 2:48 am 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 9:47 am
Posts: 47
Location: Bali Indonesia
I've never had a Kodi textile with exactly that composition. But I can tell you, I've had some Kodi textiles that were composed in other idiosyncratic, completely unique ways . . . and sizes . . . and designs. Those people are ODD out there!

Remember, most of the villages are largely abandoned. The people have left, urbanised, gone to be domestic or construction labourers overseas or in wealthier parts of Indonesia (Jakarta, Bali) . . . in many traditional villages there's basically nobody there but the aged, a handful of little kids maybe, and sick or disabled people.

Given that situation, which has been the case for some time, discontinuity (and random invention) in traditions like weaving is not surprising at all.

Here are some pictures of me in Kodi a couple of years ago . . . that's what the traditional villages look like. Sad.


Attachments:
File comment: See how sad I look . . . and tired . . . it's pretty rough in Sumba. Very sad.
kodi_2.jpg
kodi_2.jpg [ 127.82 KiB | Viewed 10595 times ]
File comment: Kids and a few very old people. That's all. I talked a lot to people in this part of West Sumba. All the fit people leave. They become maids in Singapore, KL, Jakarta . . . or rough labourers on building sites in Bali and Java . . . doing things like haul
kodi_1.jpg
kodi_1.jpg [ 158.32 KiB | Viewed 10595 times ]

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www.macan-tidur-textiles.com
www.susijohnston.com
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 Post subject: Decades of difference
PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 7:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Hi Susi, Wow! What a difference a couple of decades make! I was in Kodi for a couple of days in the early 80s. That is when I collected my pieces. Seems things have changed a lot since then! It is happening all over and I guess it has been happening since the beginning of the first tribes.

In the universe
Change is the only constant
Bewasamwillbe

Thanks for the update, MAC


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 Post subject: Isinai textiles
PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 6:53 pm 
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Location: Japan
Here at last are the photos of the two textiles in my collection that I think are made by the Isinai. The local supplier who brought them to me in Baguio said they were Apayao blankets as he got them in the Apayao area. He specializes in textiles and knows his cloth but Isinai pieces are so rare that I doubt he has ever heard of them, though he passes through the towns where the Isinai live every time he comes to Baguio on the bus. He has never spoken of the Isinai tribe or their textiles in all the years I have known him.

The first, ikat patterned blanket was collected in June of 1998 and the one with the woven patterns in 1996. In the 20 years I have spent going to the Philippines and collecting textiles, these are the only two pieces I have seen that I think are from the Isinai. I have seen two pieces published (noted earlier in this post) so that makes a total of FOUR ONLY!
If anyone else out there has one or knows of one that can be seen somewhere please let me know.

The crocodile and human figures on Warren's textile are similar to ikat motifs found (rarely) on Ifugao textiles but I have never seen an Ifugao blanket like his. I have been to Ifugao many times but found few textiles other than newly woven pieces. Perhaps Warren's textile is an Ifugao copy of an Isinai blanket with Ifugao motifs added but again I have never seen anything like it in Ifugao.


Attachments:
File comment: Size 205X168 cen. four panels of 42 cen. each, joined at selvedges.
isinai_funerary_blanket_n_l.jpg
isinai_funerary_blanket_n_l.jpg [ 88.99 KiB | Viewed 10396 times ]
File comment: The books say that the motifs of Isinai blankets tell a story but don't say what the story is.
isinai_funerary_blanket_up_.jpg
isinai_funerary_blanket_up_.jpg [ 119.5 KiB | Viewed 10396 times ]
File comment: There are three white fringes between the red ones but they don't show on the white background.
isinai_funerary_blanket_upw.jpg
isinai_funerary_blanket_upw.jpg [ 107.06 KiB | Viewed 10396 times ]
File comment: This motif looks like a church with a cross on top, a window, a covered entrance and perhaps a fence or foundation.
isinai_funerary_blanket_up_3_213.jpg
isinai_funerary_blanket_up_3_213.jpg [ 142.02 KiB | Viewed 10396 times ]
File comment: Can anyone tell me anything about the type of ply or twist of these warp threads?
isinai_ikat_blanket_n_luzon.jpg
isinai_ikat_blanket_n_luzon.jpg [ 105.48 KiB | Viewed 10396 times ]


Last edited by MAC on Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Post size
PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Pamela, I thought my photos were too wide at first as all of the text could not be seen. I have deleted, resized and reattached several times and everything was finally visible in the preview. However, when I submitted the post everything came out too wide again. Any idea why or advice about correcting it? Sorry it can't be read or the photos viewed fully without scrolling. :| MAC


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Hi MAC

You need to keep the images to a max width of 600 pix. I have gone in and resized the 4 images which were wider than this reducing them to 600 pix wide.

I don't know how you are resizing your images but I used PhotoShop 7 and cropped them to width of 600 pix with a resolution of 1375 pix per inch and then saved the images for the web.

Best,

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http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:36 am 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Sorry! My posts are coming out too wide for some reason? :oops:

Here are the photos of the Isinai blanket with supp. weft, woven patterns. Although the techniques used are very different the motifs of the two textiles are very similar. In this cloth, what I am guessing is a church, has a different cross on top, the window, the covered entrance and what looks more like a picket fence than a foundation. It also has what looks like steps up to the entrance. Anyone else with ideas?

Perhaps someday we may have an Isinai forum member who can read the motifs correctly for us. Note the fringes which alternate one red one white rather than 3 red and 3 white as in the other ikat cloth.

Best regards, MAC


Attachments:
File comment: Size 215X140 cen. four panels of 35 cen. joined along their selvedges
2010_05 16 # 0006 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs.JPG
2010_05 16 # 0006 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs.JPG [ 213 KiB | Viewed 10369 times ]
File comment: A similar layout with slightly different motifs, telling perhaps a slightly different story.
2010_05 26 # 0019  Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-1.JPG
2010_05 26 # 0019 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-1.JPG [ 205.89 KiB | Viewed 10369 times ]
File comment: Human figures on the left. Could they be herding ducks or geese in the rice fields?
2010_05 26 # 0014 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-3.JPG
2010_05 26 # 0014 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-3.JPG [ 253.44 KiB | Viewed 10369 times ]
File comment: The supp. weft is discontinuous and does not travel the full width of the cloth.
2010_05 26 # 0015 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-4.JPG
2010_05 26 # 0015 Isinai blanket, supp. weft woven motifs UP-4.JPG [ 319.49 KiB | Viewed 10369 times ]


Last edited by MAC on Wed Jun 23, 2010 10:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Ifugao textile motifs
PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:03 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Here are some photos of Ifugao textiles and their motifs. Textiles from the Ifugao tribal area of Northern Luzon, Philippines, are hard to find. Today, almost everyone wears western clothes and few new textiles are woven. These are primarily aimed at the tourist market.

There has been an attempt to revive the use of the ikat dyeing technique in the Banaue area and textiles with non-traditional motifs or layouts have been produced for the tourist market.

I have been to Ifugao numerous times staying 2 weeks at a time. I always asked and looked for textiles, especially old ones. I only found one old skirt with a lot of damage and 2 or 3 new textiles that I bought for lack of finding anything else. I have textiles from almost every tribal group in the Philippines and in certain cases dozens of pieces from one tribe. Ifugao is near the bottom of the number of pieces list. I have less than ten, mostly new and including two betel nut, shoulder bags. There just aren't many textiles to collect in Ifugao!

The only bright spot on the dark stage of Ifugao textiles are the long, narrow (loincloth like) textiles of spun and woven bark fiber still produced in two or three villages. These were probably originally g-strings for men but are now made for the tourist market. They are still nice, interesting textiles but have only simple, geometric, warp float woven motifs and won't be part of this post.

Basically I want to share Ifugao motifs that relate to the motifs in Warren's textile.

Best Regards, MAC


Attachments:
File comment: Although new, this blanket is traditional and could be used as a shroud or to wrap the bones of a secondary burial.
2010_05 22 # 0129 New Ifugao blanket, BAYAONG, warp float woven motif.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0129 New Ifugao blanket, BAYAONG, warp float woven motif.JPG [ 36.36 KiB | Viewed 10270 times ]
File comment: The snakes, human figures and mortars in this cloth are traditional Ifugao motifs. It is interesting that the motifs are not produced by the white warps but outlined by them and appear as shadows in the blue ground color. The motifs are not readily visibl
2010_05 22 #  0144 New Ifugao Blanket, BAYAONG UP-1.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0144 New Ifugao Blanket, BAYAONG UP-1.JPG [ 36.55 KiB | Viewed 10270 times ]
File comment: Diamonds, Red Stripes and simple, stylized, Human figures.
2005_07_0008_2 Ifugao ikat loincloth.jpg
2005_07_0008_2 Ifugao ikat loincloth.jpg [ 103.17 KiB | Viewed 10274 times ]
File comment: The crocodile motif in this cloth is traditional but the layout of mutiple, repeating, narrow stripes may not be.
2010_05 26 # 0001 New, Ifugao ikat blanket, crocodile motif.JPG
2010_05 26 # 0001 New, Ifugao ikat blanket, crocodile motif.JPG [ 114.45 KiB | Viewed 10274 times ]
File comment: This crocodile looks similar to the one on Warren's textile.
2010_05 26 # 0007 New Ifugao ikat blanket, crocodile motif UP-1.JPG
2010_05 26 # 0007 New Ifugao ikat blanket, crocodile motif UP-1.JPG [ 83.89 KiB | Viewed 10274 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 5:04 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:05 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Hello Warren, thank you for asking my opinion on your . . . . .yes Philippine Ifugao tribe cloth!
Indeed as MAC said there are similar 'blankets' among the Kankanai tribe more on central western side of Luzon and also the Isinai tribe in the middle.
Though the big difference is that the similar looking blankets from those tribes are with WOVEN patterns and yours -from the Ifugao- are with the dificult Ikat method. (Isinai may also be ikat, but their design and used symbols are quite more complicated and they have a center'field')

Your piece is also woven in four 'g-string wide' strokes, indicating the trouble of making this ikattextile.

Among the Ifugao tribe, which are most famous because of their riceteraces and headhunting like most of their neighbouring tribes, the use of Ikat is very restricted to ceremonial pieces related to wedding or death.
I wish I could post some pictures here but still havent master the skill of resizing (each individual) picture.

In the Barcelona Etnological museumcatalogue 'Etnografia de filipinas' (1986) there are two examples of loincloth with ikat; nrs. 119 and 120.

Most blankets one sees of the Ifugao are the so-called 'Bayaong' which are also deathcloth; hung around the deceased to repell bad spirits.

In the last ten years or so I have noticed a revival of the weaving among the tribes, although more among Kalinga. (Perhaps because of the demand Eric Anderson caused with his buying all good and perfect condition textiles!! :D )
So your textile could be very old and extremely rare or it could be from the later revival.

To conclude; I am 100% sure of it being Ifugao tribe (Luzon, Philippines)and hope to have been of service to you.
Kind regards, Wouter


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 5:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:05 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Just saw also MAC's pics added to this post. >Sorry I kinda 'fell into this topic' and not looking at all the given replies<

Would like to comment on all MAC's posted textiles; as they illustrate quite good waht I already wrote about the different styles among the Kankanai, the Isinai and Ifugaotribe.

MAC's textiles are the Isinai examples. And if you want to know what the symbols mean; they depics the so-called 'begnats' or different farmhouses complete with chickens (those white arrow kinda symbols).
A 'Begnat' is actually a whole family living in one (farm-)house with all animals around and with a fence around. On your blanket you can thus count the number of families/houses; a sort of village map on which one can see the waelth of each family. I suppose on the sides of the blankets are perhaps names of the families or short prayers to the gods.

The Ifugao blanket Mac shows -the darkblue and red- is actually called a 'Gamong' . The Bayaong is similar but has two big white stripes in the middle. The word 'Bayaong' also has a meaning directly to do with death but have forgotten exactly what at this moment.


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