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PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2009 2:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
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Location: UK
Got this yesterday. It appear and feels to some age. I am almost certain it is not African. I have just noyiced that the tassle end some that most so I will need to take a few more pics but thes will have to do for now. Close ups of the strip join. Added more pics do not show much but better colour.


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ZULU 030.jpg
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ZULU 029.jpg
ZULU 029.jpg [ 226.92 KiB | Viewed 7429 times ]
ZULU 026.jpg
ZULU 026.jpg [ 349.73 KiB | Viewed 7430 times ]
ZULU 025.jpg
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ZULU 024.jpg
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 Post subject: Not Southern African
PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:23 am 
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Hi HD
Beautiful weaving and finishing details things that keep me so enthused on all things textile! I see that you have "ZULU" as a file ID - this piece is definitely not Zulu nor indeed from any related group I have encountered here in Southern Africa. Furthermore, the "ikat"(?) technique that seems to be employed is not something I have seen in textiles produced in either Central, East or Southern Africa.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:56 am 
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Thanks for the reply Iain.

The picture was just in a file of weapons named Zulu. I know it is not African. You seem to suggest it is Indonesian? Which I little of, so anymore help?


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 10:58 am 
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Location: UK
Doing a little research, I have found this;
http://www.indokain.com/various/index.html
Click on Savu. Then Ikat selandang.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 12:55 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
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Location: Canterbury, UK
Your textile might be a more modern Savu piece which is not in the full tradition of the Greater or Lesser Blossom styles, perhaps a weaver who is now a Christian and not weaving in the former tradition.

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
Posts: 39
Location: UK
Thank you Pamela. It is so helpful to understand the the origins and any meanings to motifs seen on collected artifacts. I am a novice when it comes to textiles but I think there may be some vintage to this piece. I have great dissapointment regards to colour response and capturing subtle colours with my camera. These days my camara might be seen as rather old fashioned. Does anybody else find this a problem? Would a higher mega pixel number help.
This is also helpful.
http://www.asianart.com/articles/indone ... index.html

Susan said words to the effect "you will know a real Ikat textile when you see one". How right she was! especially when I compere this to the tourist piece I put on show here a year or two back.
http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... highlight=


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:13 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 2:41 pm
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Location: London, UK
The general concesus is that this is a piece from Savu. I agree, this is probably warp ikat from Savu, the colours are a little obscure and contemporary, as traditionally they are morinda and indigo, and this piece looks rather too 'pink' may be the camera. The fringe has been finished with 'twining' making this piece a selendang or shoulder cloth. It is possible it is a christian piece but most likely to be quite contemporary. It is a 2 panel piece made on a backstrap loom with the join handsewn (not very well ) together. Good pieces of cloth are usually very well sewn together with a hand done crossstitch, this looks rather poorly sewn together as the cloth is puckering.
hope this helps. LP

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:29 pm 
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Location: UK
Hello Lesley that helps a lot. I am sure it is not old. The colours are not as shown here. It has come from the belongings of the departed so it may have a few years. I have found it a learning piece.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
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Location: Japan
Hi honeydarling, What you have is a man's hip wrap from the island of Savu. It is a 9 stripe piece. Savunese wraps always have an odd number of stripes or motif bands ranging from three to nine. I have seen thousands of Savunese textiles and the only exception I have seen is a four stripe piece that I have in my collection. Savu is a small, very dry island and during the long dry season the men leave to sail around the islands of Nusa Tenggara selling lontar palm mats and sugar. As sailors and traders they have come to establish enclaves at most of the major ports of Nusa Tenggara. Savunese textiles, therefore, are produced on many islands other than Savu. The Savunese seem to be very faithful to their traditions however, and one can not distinguish between textiles produced on Savu and those produced on other islands. The smaller 3 and 5 stripe pieces are used as head and shoulder cloths and the 7 and 9 stripe pieces are usually hip wraps for the men. If my memory serves me well, when I was on Savu many years ago collecting and studying textiles, the Savunese said the repeated motif in your textile was called "Boda". It was a common, traditional motif and I saw many textiles just like yours. Without digging out my old notebooks I can't be sure, but I seem to remember that the Boda motif represented some kind of flower. Perhaps someone else can help us out with more info.. I believe that the Savunese ikated and dyed enough thread at one time to produce an identical pair of cloths. They never seemed to keep the twins together, however, as I have only found one set of twin 3 stripe head cloths which I have also kept in my collection. Hope you find this info. useful. You have a very lovely, traditional Savunese textile! Best regards, MAC


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