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 Post subject: Miao baby carrier (not!)
PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2009 3:12 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2003 9:28 am
Posts: 11
Hello Everyone,

I appreciate this forum very much, but it's more and more boring because 97 per cent of the subjects are on miao baby carrier or textiles who are on my opinion, technically perfect, but very very kitch without soul....
Anyone can display some indonesian textiles, naga, berber, bachnougs, something more powerfull ?
Sorry for the miao addict, maybe it's because it's one of the last category to buy like old one ? (now many, so, many fakes one, on the market, like everything in antique chinese market...)
All the best. Bertrand


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Now Bertrand, the tactful way of approaching this 'problem' would be to post images and information from one of the areas you mention to attract attention and posts in which you might be interested.

The quality of this forum depends on its members making contributions we can all enjoy and which may encourage new members to join us.

As you mention Indonesia I will see about posting a couple of Batak cloths from my collection. ( http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... php?t=1296 )

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: miao textiles (not)
PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:28 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2003 9:28 am
Posts: 11
Hello Pamela,

I travel now in Burma. I appreciate your answer. I would not create a polemic, only suggest to some members to share different textiles.
I will be more active in March, when I come back. All the best. Bertrand


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 5:26 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:35 pm
Posts: 54
Bertrand,

While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I believe you are missing the broader historical and cultural implications of your generalized comments.

As you yourself state, Chinese tribal textiles is one of the few areas left in the tribal textile market where a new, young, and/or less wealthy collector can still find good, if not great pieces for reasonable prices. This is the direct result of the history of colonialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. The French, British, Dutch, as well as a host of other Western powers ran rampant through the parts of the world that you mention in your post (the Dutch East Indies – modern day Indonesia, British administered India – including present-day Nagaland in India and Balochistan in Pakistan, and the French controlled Maghreb – including modern day Morocco and Algeria – home of the Berbers.

For better or for worse, the Western powers opened up tribal regions within their spheres of influence to the modern world, and in turn introduced the modern world to tribal peoples, culture, and art. While there has been a tremendous amount of research, study, publication, education and exhibition of tribal arts and peoples form Africa, the Americas, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East because of this Western influence, many of these tribal cultures continue to suffer from issues of disease, poverty, addiction and exploitation introduced by the West.

In the case of China, the colonial powers had only limited success. While they were able to carve out concessions in the major cities and ports, they never controlled vast areas of the country as they did in other parts of the world. As a result, much of the tribal areas of China remained unexplored and unknown to the West (and to a large extent even the Chinese!) until very recently.

Another unique aspect of the Chinese tribal textile market is that many of the tribal groups, including the Miao, Zhuang, Dai, Dong, Li, Yao, Yi and many others (which you, as well as others commonly and mistakenly generally refer to as simply “Miao”) continue in their textile traditions to this day. While there are some issues of “fakery”, Chinese tribal textiles have yet to be mass produced in mechanized factories as in the case of much of the modern Indonesian batik, or modern Persian rugs. What you may consider kitsch is actually the evolution of an art and culture that we are able to witness in real time if we so choose. It is that dynamic and forceful draw of being part of history that attracts so many people to Chinese tribal textiles both new and old.


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