tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Thu Dec 14, 2017 1:03 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2008 3:19 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I have just received my copy of the British Museum Magazine and see that there is a forthcoming exhibition 'on tribal culture in the remote region of Arunachal Pradesh' discussed. The exhibition is due to run from 23 Oct 08 to 13 Apr 09 and is titled "Between Tibet and India: cultural diversity in the eastern Himalayas" and it will be on view in Room 91. Although the article said to check the BM website there is currently nothing showing there in either current or future exhibitions. Presumably it may 'appear' on the What's on section http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on.aspx in due course!

The exhibition is focused on a research project which the BM joined 6 years ago based at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), led by Stuart Blackburn working with colleagues at insitutions in India carrying out research in the region known in colonial times as the North-East Frontier Agency which is the modern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh.
Quote:
"Even at the time of Indian Independence in 1947, there was still much of fundamental importance that was unknown about the remote, impenetrable foothills and the high mountain peaks that are inhabited by at least thirty completely different tribal groups, who speak about 25 different Tibeto-Burman languages. ....... The understanding that very rapid culture change is taking place in this region lies at the base of the project's investigations. Along with this comes the realisation that change has always taken place in these tribal societies, not least as many of these groups still relate myths which record their travels through the Himalayas before they finally settled in their current locations. There is no such thing as an unchanging 'traditional tribal society'.

The cultures of two quite distinct tribal groups - the Apatani and the Monpa - will form the nucleus of the exhibition..........."


I don't know how many textiles will be in the exhibit but there are some shown in photos in the article.
Quote:
"The displays will draw on a wide range of material, both rare collections made in the 1940s as well as contemporary items acquired during the run of the project...."


The article also gives this web references for images http://michaelaramtarr.net/ which is very worth visiting. Don't be put off by the basic nature of the web page that appears. Files 'Dynamics of Diversity' and 'Photos' both have (excellent) images.

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:12 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Siriol has pointed out to me that there is a seminar at SOAS on the material above see http://www.soas.ac.uk/events/event45864 There is also info on the exhibition at the BM on the SOAS site http://www.soas.ac.uk/events/event45865 There is now info on the BM site at http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/f ... india.aspx which also refers to the seminar at SOAS.

So far Siriol has had no luck getting a response out of SOAS about attending the seminar!

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2008 12:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2003 8:50 pm
Posts: 101
Location: Cheam, UK
I have recently visited the exhibition at the British Museum:

"Between Tibet and India:Cultural Diversity in the Eastern Himalayas"

This exhibition is, I believe, the first in the UK to focus on the remote Himalayan region of Arunachal Pradesh which lies in the exteme Northeast of India, and is home to a large number of tribes on which very little has been published to date, and whose names and cultures are largely unfamiliar to outsiders. Their textiles are equaly unknown, and to me, this is very exciting territory for this reason.

The area is inhabited by tribes such as the Monpa, Sherdukpen, Aka, Apa- Tani, Nishi, Aidi, Mishmi, Miri and many other groups, some being seen in literature for the first time, eg the remote Mra people, a part of the Tagin group which is itself an artifical catagory. So, all in all this is still very much unknown terrain for the researcher.

The exhibition itself focuses on two ethnic groups the Buddhist Monpa of western Arunachal, bordering Bhutan, and the Apa Tani who inhabit a remote valley tucked into the mountains midway between the plains of Assam, and the Tibetan border. The Apa Tani are unifluenced by Buddhism and adhere to their indigenous beliefs.

The exhibition revolves around this major difference between the two groups, and the section on the Monpa is rich in ceremonial artifacts easily recognisable as belonging to the Tibetan/Bhutanese sphere of influence, eg, thankas, votive offerings and prayer wheels . Photographs accompanying the exhibits show stupas and various scenes typical of Himlalayan Buddhism. Monpa textiles are also displayed together with photos of traditional jackets being worn. Those worn by women are decorated with geometric and animal designs. They are quite distinctive and are also worn by neighbouring peoples, eg the Aka, and also across the border in the exteme east of Bhutan.

The other main section of the exhibition focusing on the Apa Tani, displays various aspects of their life, such as feasts of merit, and textile arts, together with other items of costume, eg cane hats, nose plugs for women and cane tails worn by men. The archive and recent photos of costume are of particular interest and show just how much of the material culture has been retained, especially for Shamans and ceremonial events. The highlight, for me, is a beautiful Shaman's shawl predominantly woven in dark blue and muted orange which dates from mid 20th centry (approx.) Recent textiles are also shown - A woman's jacket and modern shawl. These shawls are now worn by many people at festivals, and are still well woven and decorated, but in my opinion, no longer have that very special quality seen in the Shaman's shawl. They, however, still retain the same general colour range - orange seems to be especially favoured, and many modern shawls are white with orange borders.

The exhibition also shows a variety of hats from different tribes, highlighting their differences and similarities across the region.

Another important aspect of the exhibition is its focus on cultural change. Ajustment to increasing modern influences is of particular interest especially with reference to clothing and textile traditions among the Apa Tani. This, and the major cultural differences between the Apa Tani and Monpa arising from their religious practices and proximity to trade routes across the Himalayas, makes for a varied and highly interesting exhibition on this remote region and certainly encourages one to find out more.

Overall well worth visiting.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 3:29 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I endorse Siriol's conclusion that the exhibit is well worth visiting. It is quite a small exhibit in room 91 at the BM so it is possible to really take in all the displays and text. The Apatani textiles and the basket work hats were particularly interesting to me.

As I was sorting myself out to enter the exhibit I was 'jumped' from the rear by way of greeting by Diccon Pullen as he and Lesley were leaving. I was fortunate, when I recovered, to be introduced to the exhibit's curator, T Richard Blurton, Curator, South and South East Asia at the BM who had come to see the Pullens. He kindly talked to us about the Apatani textiles. Information on these, but not photos, can be found on the BM website via Research, search the database if you search for 'Apa tani' http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/s ... abase.aspx

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group