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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 2:58 pm 
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Forum member Marie-Noelle has sent me photos of two textiles which she is keen to share with forum members. Unfortunately she has not, so far, managed to get to grips with the forum technology. I am, therefore, going to post the items on two different threads as, apart from being from south-east Asia they are not really related.

On this thread I am posting photos of a textile from Laos of which Marie-Noelle says:
Quote:
one from the Attapoeu province, south Laos, a piece I find interesting, waved with some glass pearls. I think it comes from some Attapoeu tribes, but I'm not sure of the tribe.

I will reserve my comments for post(s) below. I am very pleased indeed that Marie-Noelle has shared these photos as it gives me an opportunity to link in a private email discussion of some months ago between Sandra Niessen, Marla Mallett and myself on the subject of warp twining. Sandra and I felt quite guilty at the time that we had not shared our conversation with the forum and, although I meant to get all the info together and post it, I am afraid that I was overtaken by events!


Attachments:
File comment: Apron Laos-Attapoeu
Apron-Laos-AttapopoeuW.jpg
Apron-Laos-AttapopoeuW.jpg [ 69.26 KiB | Viewed 40515 times ]
File comment: detail
DetailW.jpg
DetailW.jpg [ 64.63 KiB | Viewed 40515 times ]

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Last edited by Pamela on Sun Feb 17, 2008 2:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Katu/Cotu loincloth
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 4:09 pm 
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I believe that this is a Katu/Cotu man's incloth and I have three in my own collection. The Katu/Cotu may be found in both southern Laos and in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. In this latter respect 'Textiles of the Central Highlands of Vietnam' by Michael C. Howard and Kim Be Howard (published by White Lotus Press) ISBN 974-4800-13-5 is a good reference. There are a couple of Katu loincloths from Quang Nam Province shown in Plates 77 and 78 on pages 176 and 177. Plate 86 on page 189 was collected from the Jeh-Trieng, Kon Tum Province but Michael Howard suggests that it is of Katu origin having been traded to the Jeh-Trieng. As Michael Howard has previously given us permission to use photos from his books as long as we give proper attribution I am going to post them here.

He says of the Katu (page 43):
"There are abut 37,000 Katu (spelled Co-tu by the Vietnamese) in Vietnam. They live primarily in the upland areas surrounding the Bung and Cai Rivers in four communes in Phu Loc District in Thua Thien-Hue Province and in Hien and Giang Districts in northwestern Quang Nam Province. There are approximately 17,000 Katu in Saravane and Sekong Provinces in Laos."

My understanding from Olivier Tallec, from whom I obtained my finest Katu/Cotu loincloth, is that he was told by the leading collector/dealer that he bought it from that the greater the amount of red tasseling at the ends of the loincloth the higher the status of the wearer.

[I will post this and add the photos in case I get interruped and lose the lot!]


Attachments:
File comment: Fig 77 Katu, Quang Nam Province; loincloth, 28 x 386 cm. 'Textiles of the Central Highlands of Vietnam' by Michael C. Howard and Kim Be Howard
77p177.jpg
77p177.jpg [ 70.84 KiB | Viewed 40510 times ]
File comment: Fig 78 Katu, Quang Nam Province; loincloth, 40 x 417 cm. 'Textiles of the Central Highlands of Vietnam' by Michael C. Howard and Kim Be Howard
78p177.jpg
78p177.jpg [ 67.69 KiB | Viewed 40510 times ]
File comment: Fig 86 Jeh-Trieng, Kon Tum Province; loincloth; probably of Katu origin, having been traded to the Jeh-Trieng. 29 x 422 cm plus fringe from 'Textiles of the Central Highlands of Vietnam' by Michael C. Howard and Kim Be Howard
86p179.jpg
86p179.jpg [ 63.72 KiB | Viewed 40510 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 4:42 pm 
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I am posting a photo of the end of Katu/Cotu loincloth that came from Olivier. In this example the beads are metal rather than white glass. This was originally collected in Laos and reputedly woven for a man of high status.

I will follow up - when I have the strength - with some comments about weft twining which is used at the ends of all the loincloths shown including Marie-Louis's. Susan Stem and I, since we first saw these loincloths (from several groups in Laos and Vietnam) have been fascinated by the way that the red threads going across the loincloths in their end pieces give the appearance of 'knitting' stitches. We were puzzled so perhaps it is worth sharing my journey of discovery!


Attachments:
File comment: End piece of Katu/Cotu chief's loincloth from Laos
IMGP1608w.jpg
IMGP1608w.jpg [ 58.36 KiB | Viewed 40507 times ]
File comment: detail of Katu/Cotu chief's loincloth from Laos
IMGP1609w.jpg
IMGP1609w.jpg [ 65.81 KiB | Viewed 40507 times ]

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 Post subject: ...weft twining...
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:26 pm 
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Now, to carry out my threat of talking about weft twining!

Back in May 2007 I was reading through some of the draft text for Sandra Niessen's book on Batak textiles which is currently in the (hopefully) final editing stage. It should be a wonderful reference on Batak textiles when it finally sees the light of day in all the glory of its printed forum. I was reading the chapters on technique to give input as a lay-person i.e. not an academic and not a weaver.

I found fascinating her discussion on how an understanding of the relationship between Batak textile design and technique required detailed information on Batak textile production techniques. Scholars have typified the nature of Batak textile tradition as ancient with features in common with other ‘isolated’ peoples in the Indonesian archipelago. Key features include the use of a backstrap loom with a circular, continuous warp creating warp-faced textiles having an emphasis on such warp-related patterning as warp stripes, warp ikat and supplementary warp.

Sandra described the continuous warp process and the unwoven section of warp between the start and end of the weaving on the continuous warp where no further weaving of weft threads was possible. This is normally where the warp is cut to release it from the loom and the dangling warp ends form a fringe. To keep the fringe ends of the warp tidy Batak weavers commonly twine weft yarns into them along the edges of the textile. The twining technique is also ancient and, in the case of the Batak, is an off-loom process.

She went on to discuss warp-faced weaving and the fact that in this process the weft yarns are largely hidden and patterning produced in the warp via warp stripes, warp ikat and supplementary warp. The limited patterning in the weft available in warp-faced weaving is largely limited to weft wrapping where the weft yarns are literally wrapped around warp yarns by hand, twill weave patterning and the twining technique mentioned.

You may well ask, how does this relate to Katu/Cotu loin cloths? Well, I realised that their loin cloths are warp-faced with strong warp stripes. However, the weft patterning giving the appearance of knitting stitches clearly sits above the warp and is not buried in it. I wondered if it was one of the weft patterning methods mentioned by Sandra in connection with Batak weft patterning on warp-faced cloths. I was, however, aware, that the twining in my own Batak ulos did not give a ‘knitting”-like appearance – see the photo appearing first below.

I emailed Sandra and sent her some photos of one of my Katu/Cotu loincloths which Susan Stem found for me:

Quote:
“Dear Sandra

I am sending you some photos of a man's loincloth which probably from the Central Highlands of Vietnam and is probably Katu/Cotu.

Having been reading (in your draft) about Batak warp-faced weavings where special techniques are used to show the weft threads i.e. twining or weft wrapping, I looked at the photos of this loincloth with new interest. As an aside I have a small collection of loincloths from Laos and Vietnam and this is one that Susan Stem has found for me. She refers to 'distinctive knit-like weaving technique' which they have. I was wondering whether this might be either twining or weft wrapping - I don't actually know what the latter looks like.

These weavings will be the 'ancient' form woven on a continuous warp backstrap loom and generally warp-faced. They often have beads threaded on the weft as also found in Batak weavings.

See Susan's description of the textile:
TAV202 - Probably from the Katu/Cotu, this attractive loincloth is a beautiful combination of colors, which have softened with age and use. Woven in the distinctive knit-like weaving technique, it is all cotton and possibly dyed with natural color. White glass beads are woven into the structure of the cloth and form multiple patterns on each end. Condition is very good, with no holes. (See Howard, p.177 Textiles of the Central Highlands for similar examples). Size: 162" x 13.5" (not including fringe).”

Best wishes

Pamela

Sandra came back to me as follows:

Quote:
“Dear Pamela,

I am looking at the beautiful loincloth you sent me. (What is a loincloth? Was it a sash to hold up his other clothing? Or was it wrapped around and around and between his legs?) First I changed the orientation of all the photographs so that the warp is going up and down. It is amazing how I am totally unable to look at a cloth unless I know the orientation of the warp.

The first thing I would like to commend on is the warp stripes in the centre. The red and blue sripe sandwiched between the white stripes is what Rita Bolland called "warp technique". You asked me about that once, thinking it was a generic term for all techniques in the warp (that makes sense.) But this is what I refer to as "warp technique". It is found in various Batak textiles. Here the small horizontal stripes are the result of the way the stripe was warped, but there are textiles in which this stripe is the result of supplementary warp.

And now on to the matter at hand:
Weft-wrapping is definitely done on the fringes. A very large-scale kind of weft-wrapping. Literally the warp fringes are wrapped! If this had been done in a more complex and dainty way, you could produce patterns etc.

I have just blown up your photographs, and I would not be surprised if that knit-like section was done by twining. I notice that there is a section of it above and below the beaded section which is definitely woven. I wonder how they did their twining? Would they have done it off-loom, and then put the textile back in the loom to do the beaded section, and then go off-loom again to do the twining? Nee, toch! Would they do their twining on-loom? Time to go to Vietnam and Laos..... It is a fabulous detail. Ah, the work that people used to put into their clothes!

Thanks for showing these to me!

Sandra”


I then responded to Sandra but think that would be better as another post as there are several more photos (which forum-members may like to see). I hope that you are not all bored stiff! However, I find these loincloths fascinating and gathering information on them and their techniques in one place may be of interest to others than myself.


Attachments:
File comment: Detail of Batak twining on a warp-faced cloth with warp ikat
batak-twining.jpg
batak-twining.jpg [ 58.18 KiB | Viewed 40479 times ]
File comment: loincloth - probably Katu/Cotu
tav202_122w.jpg
tav202_122w.jpg [ 70.3 KiB | Viewed 40479 times ]
File comment: body of loincloth showing warp-faced weaving
Mail-TAV202_Body.jpg
Mail-TAV202_Body.jpg [ 153.46 KiB | Viewed 40479 times ]
File comment: detail of possible twining on end of loincloth - probably Katu/Cotu
Mail-TAV202_Detail_1.jpg
Mail-TAV202_Detail_1.jpg [ 187.19 KiB | Viewed 40479 times ]

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Last edited by Pamela on Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:24 pm 
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so it goes on...........

I went back to Sandra with some info on loincloths (this link has been posted before on the forum). Subsequently I have discovered that the Katu/Cotu loincloth is worn somewhat differently as it is also crossed over the torso as well as around the loins and the Katu have one of the longest loin-and-chest-cloths in Vietnam. (‘Understanding Katu Culture’ by Ta Duc and published by Hue Center for Folk Culture Studies.)

One of the Katu/Cotu loincloths which I refer to is the one from Laos which came from Olivier and the photos of which are already shown above. Hence photos below of only 2 loincloths – one Katu and one Ta-Oi.

Quote:
Dear Sandra

Very many thanks for your comments.

I believe that a loincloth is wrapped around the body and between a man's legs. One of the earliest forms of clothing in S E Asia (and elsewhere no doubt), possibly also for women. I would think that the Batak in the distant past might have worn one although the weather can get a bit cool so perhaps not. However, this could be said for the Central Highlands of Vietnam. See this article on Borneo loincloths with some helpful diagrams on how to put on a loincloth: http://www.ikanlundu.com/literary/borneo_loincloth.html It is quite an interesting article.

I agree with you about orientation of weaving so that warp is perpendicular when viewed.

I wonder how the twining would be done if it is in the body of the cloth. Most of these loincloths seem to have the 'knit' and tassels on the end pieces which might lead one to think that they were done off-loom although I wonder about how they kept the tension so well for such long sections when the web is out of the loom.

I attach photos of 3 other loincloths using the technique - 2 Katu/Cotu and one Ta-Oi. Probably from Laos but could be Vietnam, Central Highlands as the groups are spread through the mountainous area which runs through both countries. There is a close-up of one of the Katu/Cotu loincloths (which comes from Laos) which shows the 'knit' quite well. There is fine black beading in the crosses.

On my 'things to do' list is making a photogallery of my loincloths. Does not help that they are stored in different places.

all the best,

Pamela

Sandra came back to me with the text below and possibly an interesting link between the word for ‘twining’ in Borneo and the Batak in Sumatra as well as the realisation that we should have been sharing this discussion with you on the forum!

Quote:
Dear Pamela,

Those are interesting images. They seem to have interesting techniques, especially the Ta Oi, but the images didn't have sufficient resolution for me to really look at them closely.

I quite enjoyed the article on the loincloth. Interesting is the use of the word sirat -- and I wonder about the etymology of the word, now. Might it have something to do with twining? Because there appears to be much twining in the "sirat" in Borneo, and the Batak "sirat" is always twined. I had always thought that sirat might have had to do with "surat" (letters, writing) because of the meanings twined into the edges of Batak cloth.

Yes, do make a photogallery of your loincloths! Stunning.

Thanks for sharing this. Should we have done this on your website?

Sandra


Attachments:
File comment: Detail of Katu/Cotu loincloth
Mail-TAL346_End_Panel.jpg
Mail-TAL346_End_Panel.jpg [ 112.63 KiB | Viewed 40485 times ]
File comment: Detail of Ta-Oi loincloth
Mail-Ta-Oi-Loincloth-.jpg
Mail-Ta-Oi-Loincloth-.jpg [ 64.71 KiB | Viewed 40485 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:40 pm 
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Meanwhile…………………

............I also went to forum-member Marla Mallett’s excellent book ‘Woven Structures: A Guide to Oriental Rug and Textile Analysis’ to look for these techniques. Chapter 4 on Twining showed me exactly what I was looking for! I learnt that there is twining and ‘countered’ twining where the twist of the twining in a second row is reversed (or counter) to that in the first. Countered rows can also be made simultaneously with two yarn loops. I will post some diagrams from Marla’s book to illustrate.

I emailed Marla to ask her advice and permission to use material from her book:

Quote:
“Dear Marla

I was just looking in your 'Woven Structures' book for twining as I had been discussing this with Sandra Niessen re a Katu/Cotu item from Susan Stem. I have been reading chapters on Batak weaving technique from Sandra's new book on Batak textiles currently being prepared for publication. (It is going to be a fantastic reference work). We, Susan Stem and I, have always been fascinated by a weft-wise effect on some loincloths from Vietnam and Laos which we have referred to as looking like 'knitting'. Looking at your book and the section on twining I think that what we are looking at is 'countered twining' pps 61-63. What is amazing with these loincloths is the depth of the twining bands. See details from a couple of loincloths in my collection. Have I 'read' the info and diagrams in your book correctly against my loincloth detail photos? If so, can I quote on the forum and use your diagram and a photo from your book re countered twining? Sandra has just questioned whether our conversation should be on the forum since she has also come up with an interesting verbal link between Iban 'sirat' in a web article by Otto Steinmayer and the use of the same word in Batak twining. I guess that Sandra and I could re-create some of our email exchange and it would be great to add in info from your book.

Bye for now and sorry to intrude on your very busy day!!!

all the best,

Pamela”

Marla came back to me:

Quote:
“Dear Pamela,

Of course you can use drawings, diagrams, whatever you want from my book—anytime. I have one of the Katu loincloths on my website, and I think there are some others in my crates…I’ll have a look as soon as there’s a free moment and the phone stops ringing. And yes, they use twining—“countered” if the yarn segments slant in opposite directions in successive rows as seems apparent in your photo. One typical feature of twining is the fringes at the sides—at the ends of the twined rows—since it’s only practical to work with short yarn segments, and though I don’t see that in your photo, I’m betting that they are there.

Best,
Marla”


Attachments:
File comment: twining images and text from page 61 of Marla Mallett’s book ‘Woven Structures: A Guide to Oriental Rug and Textile Analysis’ Chapter 4 on Twining
twiningMM01.jpg
twiningMM01.jpg [ 61.32 KiB | Viewed 40481 times ]
File comment: twining image and text from page 63 of Marla Mallett’s book ‘Woven Structures: A Guide to Oriental Rug and Textile Analysis’ Chapter 4 on Twining
twiningMM02.jpg
twiningMM02.jpg [ 23.77 KiB | Viewed 40481 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:49 pm 
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Marla then followed up with the following detailed email and stunning images:

Quote:
Dear Pamela,

I’ve dug a bit and found some more Katu loincloths. I’ve attached five photos.

A. This first example shows the twining worked in pairs of single rows, countered. The twining yarns extend at the sides to form bound fringe. This is the “purest” decorative use of twining. Separate tassels have been added in other areas of this piece.

B. Paired rows of plain, countered twining; in some areas, two differently colored rows have been worked simultaneously across the width, with single yarns or pairs of yarns alternating in position between the two rows to create a pattern. I don’t recall seeing this method of twined patterning from other parts of the world. All of the twined rows start and stop short of the selvedge on this example; decorative tassels were applied separately.

C. Countered twining, the rows worked separately. Narrow decorative bands with pairs of rows worked simultaneously as in “B.” Orange twining yarns extend to form fringe; other colored rows were cut short of the selvedge.

D. This example is about twice as fine in scale as “C.” Double rows of countered twining MAY have been worked together, as in my book diagram 4.11. Loops forms one selvedge; the yarn cut ends are knotted at the other selvedge. Tassels are attached separately.

E. Another example, with simple, continuous double rows of countered twining. Unfortunately I no longer have this piece so can’t furnish a detail.

In most parts of the world where twining has been used as a fabric construction technique, fringes appear as a distinctive integral part of the object’s design. One example: “Glaoua” weavings from the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Other times, knots are tied along one selvage, as in Pre-Columbian Peruvian burial wrappings.

Best,

Marla

PS. If you wish to use any of this in your on-line discussion, feel free. “


Attachments:
File comment: A - Attapoeu
b_4849dd_attapoeu_a_117w.jpg
b_4849dd_attapoeu_a_117w.jpg [ 71.08 KiB | Viewed 40472 times ]
File comment: B - Attapoeu
B-6769DD-Attapoeu-B.jpg
B-6769DD-Attapoeu-B.jpg [ 242.25 KiB | Viewed 40472 times ]
File comment: C - Attapoeu
B-6768DD-Attapoeu-C.jpg
B-6768DD-Attapoeu-C.jpg [ 155.56 KiB | Viewed 40472 times ]
File comment: D - Attapoeu
B-4851DD-Attapoeu-D.jpg
B-4851DD-Attapoeu-D.jpg [ 132.87 KiB | Viewed 40471 times ]
File comment: E - White beads
B-4850DD-White Beads-E.jpg
B-4850DD-White Beads-E.jpg [ 175.05 KiB | Viewed 40471 times ]

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Last edited by Pamela on Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Katu/Cotu loincloths
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:24 pm 
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Just to round off with and not talking about twining but Katu/Cotu loincloths - which is how this great long thread started - I thought I would quote some interesting information on the loincloths from an extract from ‘Understanding Katu Culture’ by Ta Duc and published by Hue Center for Folk Culture Studies which I have, thanks to Susan Stem.

Quote:
Page 34, 10. Some features of Katu apparel:

Traditionally, Katu men wear loincloths varying from one and a half to eight meters long and abut 35 to 40 centimeters wide. In the past, the poor owned only one short loincloth made of bark or animal skin, whil the rich could wear colorful, richly decorated cotton loincloths of greater length. It is said that to weave a loincloth six meters long, decorated with bead designs, a Katu wife had to work on her primitive back loom consistently for at least two months.

At present most Katu men own at least one beautiful loinclith. In fact, it is no longer a loincloth but rather a loin-and-chest-cloth. It is possible that the Katu posses the longest loin-and-chest-cloths in Vietnam. On ceremonial occasions, the men wear such cloths wrapped about their shoulders and chest, making a cross-shape across the chest similar in style of Bahnar and Sedang men......

....But the metal lead, although gray and heavy, was also used by the Katu to make small beads or rings decorating their loincloths. Apparently in Vietnam, such lead beads are unique to the Katu and Taoih......

.........At present, the Kato dress is decorated mostly with white beads imported from China or Japan......"


There is a small image of the loin-and-chest-cloths being worn but it is not very clear on my photocopy. I don't know if Susan's original is any clearer?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:20 pm 
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....new follow-up from Marla this evening! I am very pleased to see that she has come back to me on the big open question as to whether the Katu/Cotu twining was executed on or off the loom:

Quote:
"I think that the only question remaining from your exchange on loincloth techniques concerns whether or not the loincloth twining was done while the pieces were still on the loom. There would be no reason to remove such a piece from the loom, as it's much easier to twine while the warp is held under tension. Twining does not use the loom's shed-making devices, however; the process is done with the shed closed. Strictly speaking, twining is not "weaving," as no "interlacing" is involved.

On terminology: A textile in which we see only the warp is "warp faced." If there is design (other than just warp stripes), the most all-inclusive, general term is "warp patterned." Warp patterned textiles may or may not be warp faced. Lots of confusing terms exist to describe specific types of warp patterning.

All the best,

Marla

PS....You're free to post this note if you wish
.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:45 am 
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What a great thread! (Pun intended) This is the forum at its best: a thorough discussion of a textile technique as related to specific examples, with experts contributing, lots of good photos and the information available to all thanks to the internet. Many thanks to all involved!

Here is the photo from the book to which Pamela referred, showing the loincloths being worn ceremonially across the chest, as well as a loincloth.


Attachments:
Mail-Katu-loincloths.jpg
Mail-Katu-loincloths.jpg [ 57.3 KiB | Viewed 40422 times ]

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 11:53 am 
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Susan

Thanks very much indeed for this post of the photo of the loincloths being worn across the chest/torso and around the loins. My small b&w photo did not make it clear but this larger colour one is much more helpful. It looks to me as if the cloth crossed across the chest is a different one from that around the loins as the warp stripes seem to be different widths. The text from the book suggested to me - as the Katu loincloth is so long - that it was the same cloth being used for all the wrapping. (..also the central loincloth looks more Ta-Oi to me than Katu??)

Always there are unanswered questions....which makes this passion for traditional textiles so very fascinating!

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:46 pm 
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Pamela-
As I posted the photo, I had a similar thought/question. I don't think the one across the chest is the same as that being worn as a loincloth... it doesn't really look like the center section of any of the loincloths I've seen. However, if it's a newer style, perhaps that is the way they're made now. The striping is more consistent with some that I've seen on Jarai or Bahnar textiles, tho not necessarily their loincloths. These groups are in the same general area of Vietnam and Laos.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:21 pm 
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Pamela & Susan have you got the following publication in your libraries?

Vietnam: Image of the Community of 54 Ethnic Groups.Vietnam News Agency. The Ethnic Cultures Publishing House. Hanoi. 2000

In the section covering the Katu/Cotu there is a photo of a man wearing a loin cloth similar to those illustrated above, but this time with a cloth draped only across one shoulder, thus illustrating that such textiles could be arranged/ combined in different ways. Weather this is at the whim of the wearer or is village specific may merit further research. Again it is a bit difficult to see if the cloth covering the wearer's chest is an extension of the loin cloth or is actually a seperate textile. I would opt of the latter idea.(as in the case of Susan's photo above)

Sorry I can't provide a page number, as my copy is difficult to access behind other books in my ever expanding library! but if you have a copy the photo should be easy to find.

Many thanks for such an interesting thread on these little known peoples and their textiles!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:37 pm 
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Siriol - thanks!

Yes, I do have 'Vietnam-Image of the Community of 54 Ethnic Groups'. On page are images of the 'Co-tu' including the two I post below. Interestingly, in the text on page 58 it says:
Quote:
"Co-tu attire is simple. Men wear loincloths and leave their upper torsos naked. Women wear skirts and short vests. In winter they wear a piece of cloth."

Again I think that the torso sashes look to be separate from the loincloths.

Forum members who are interested in books on the minorities in Vietnam may be interested in sourcing them from Vietnam Artbooks http://www.vietnamartbooks.com/ I have found them pretty good and the number of anthropological books has greatly increased. I hoped to receive a book on Katu culture but unfortunately they have not had it in stock.

Thanks again, Siriol for remembering these photographs.


Attachments:
File comment: 'The Co-tu's attire' from page 59 of 'Vietnam-Image of the Community of 54 Ethnic Groups'
co-tu.jpg
co-tu.jpg [ 55.15 KiB | Viewed 40346 times ]
File comment: 'The Co-tu's costume in festive days' from page 59 of 'Vietnam-Image of the Community of 54 Ethnic Groups'
co-tu_festival.jpg
co-tu_festival.jpg [ 78.06 KiB | Viewed 40345 times ]

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:47 am 
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Siriol-
Many thanks for bringing that volume to our attention- I do have it also. After studying the photos, it is apparent that in the first one the man is wearing two different cloths, with the one over the upper torso tied with string at his right side. The second one shows both cloths having similar striping and one cannot tell if they connect, or are separate. I have to wonder if perhaps these outfits were put together specifically for the photos (false beard and all), especially the one from the Katu book. 'Folkloric' productions are portrayed in several other sources I have, and these may be examples. Also, it is not uncommon for nakedness to be covered somewhat for the purpose of decorum for a photograph.

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