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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 3:01 am 
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This baby carrier, collected in Nankai, consists of four overlapping panels. The uppermost layer is divided into three smaller appliqued and embroidered flaps. The second panel is done with applique and embroidery whilst the third also has a central wax resist indigo dyed section. The design of this wax resist imitates the applique and embroidery of the second panel. The bottommost panel is done in applique alone. The straps are done in applique and embroidery. The straps are heavily stitched to reinforce the material.
Regards
Iain


Attachments:
File comment: Full view
BC4.jpg
BC4.jpg [ 47.86 KiB | Viewed 13001 times ]
File comment: Second panel
BC3.jpg
BC3.jpg [ 67.15 KiB | Viewed 13001 times ]
File comment: Third panel with wax resist
BC2.jpg
BC2.jpg [ 63.77 KiB | Viewed 13001 times ]
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:21 am 
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Iain

Very many thanks indeed for posting this baby carrier. One frequently sees the clothing in this style but this is the first baby carrier that I have seen - and what a very nice one. Clearly done for love of the child and to express expertise since the layers cannot be seen unless lifted up as you have done in the photo. Interesting that at least the top two layers of the flaps are not lined so it is possible to see the reverse of the stitching - I do like to be able to examine this!

As ever, thanks for sharing!

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 Post subject: Baby carrier lining
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:35 am 
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Greetings Pamela
The third layer is also unlined. The final layer is actually lined with heavy undyed hemp/raimie.
Regards
Iain


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:41 am 
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I suppose that the last layer closest to the baby's body would help to protect the other layers from the baby's urine. I bought a very nice, almost new, layered babycarrier in Sa Pa, Northwest Vietnam in '95 - I am ashamed to say that I bought it off the mother's back and the poor baby then had to be carried! The bottom parts of the carrier were soaking wet with urine so it was immediately destined to be washed in the hotel bathroom washbasin! No careful thought about how it should be treated!

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:49 am 
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Iain

Is the fine stripped applique on the babycarrier applied by hand or by machine? I cannot tell from the photos as there is nothing close enough for me to tell.

Thanks,

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 Post subject: Applique detail
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:21 am 
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Pamela,
The fine applique is all done by hand! I attach a close up (my apologies for the quality) which shows a detail of the reverse side of the strap and the handstitching. A serious amount of work went into this carrier!
Regards
Iain


Attachments:
File comment: Reverse detail of handstitched applique on baby carrier strap.
clip_image002.jpg
clip_image002.jpg [ 51.51 KiB | Viewed 12941 times ]
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 Post subject: Stitching Clarification
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:40 am 
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pamela
The previous image may actually be a little misleading as the stitching here is much sturdier - it forming part of the strap reinforcing whilst also being used for stitching together the fine applique strips.
The fine applique strips on the remainder of the carrier are all hand stitched using a very dark, almost black, thread - very difficult to see in these images. The larger yellow and red bands that make up the outer borders of each panel are machine stitched.
Hope this clarifies in detail!
Regards
Iain
Correction: Now that I have this carrier out again to photograph in detail - the entire carrier is handstitched - applique as well as the larger yellow and red bands that make up the panel borders.


Last edited by iain on Mon Aug 06, 2007 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 2:07 pm 
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Iain - very many thanks indeed!

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 4:07 pm 
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Iain

I have been trying to find Nankai on a map of China (Guizhou).

'A Picture Album of China's Miao Costume and Ornaments', p346, starts the description of 'Nankai Style:
Quote:
"Represented by the style of Nankai Town of Shuicheng County in Guizhou Province it is distributed in the counties of Shuicheng, Nayong and Hezhang."

'Clothings and Ornaments of China's Miao People' which I always turn to first says on p142:
Quote:
"This style of clothing and ornament are popular mainly in the Bijie area of Guizhou province. The Miao people of this area are of two kinds, one kind is commonly called the 'small floral Miao' people, there are about 100,000 of them, they lived on the south bank of the Liuchong river, many of them lived in Hezhang, Nayong and Shicheng. Another kind is commonly called the 'Wooden comb Miao' people, they lived on the north bank of the Liuchong river, many of them lived in Bijie, Dafang, some of them lived in the suburbs of Guiyang, Anshun, Weining, a few lived in Yunnan."
There is a man's 'shawl' from Ertang, Weining which is very similar in style to the babycarrier. I have a 'shawl' bought at the Ethnology Museum in Kunming, Yunnan in 2000.

There is rather a nice legend on page 144 against two details of 'shawl' designs - the details are of the embroidered and applied squares.
Quote:
"According to legends of the 'Small floral Miao' people, two brothers lived in the regions north of the Yellow river, they were forced to migrate to the southwest because of years of war havoc. Riding on a horse the elder brother leads the way, and the younger brother walks behind. The younger brother is reluctant to leave their old home, so he painted the village sights on his own clothing. The square patterns represent land, the red cloth stripes are symbolical of fish, the curved lines are symbolical of mussels and stars, the bending lines are symbolical of trees, the long red stripe and yellow stripe are symbolical of China's two longest rivers, the Long River (Changjiang) and the Yellow River."


Searching the web (again) I have found Wang Jun's website for CYTS see page http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/DOC_view.asp?LID=128&NID=170 which gives info on location and says that Nankai township is 50 kms north of Shuicheng. On my older Nelles map of Southern China (2000) I have finally found 'L. - Nankai' which is north of 'L. -Shuicheng' Liupanshui. I can't find anything on the map for 'L....'. Nankai is not shown on my 2005 edition of Nelles map of Southern China. See the map on the CYTS website http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/map.asp which shows Liupanshui (Shuicheng).

Sorry, is all of this rather esoteric.......!

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 4:39 pm 
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I have hunted down on Wang Jun's website his and Gina Corrigan's photos as follows:

http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=24&zid=819 and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=35&zid=819 and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=53&zid=819 (Gina Corrigan's photo) and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=64&zid=819 (Gina Corrigan's photo) and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=83&zid=819 (Gina Corrigan's photo) and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=84&zid=819 (Gina Corrigan's photo) and http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=86&zid=819 (photo by Gina Corrigan) and Eureka a babycarrier - look at the number of tiers.... http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=87&zid=819 (photo by Gina Corrigan)

There is a babycarrier from the Bijie area which is from a different Miao group but note the 3 tiers on it and also some similar style of embroidery. We often talk about the influence of one group on another due to proximity and I think this illustrates it. http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/photo_img.asp?pg=60&zid=819 (Gina Corrigan's photo)

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 Post subject: Map finding
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:36 am 
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Pamela
The terminology for areas in China can be a little confusing I hope the following helps:

Liupanshui (六盘水市) serves as a prefecture in Guizhou. The term for Luipanshui city proper is 六盘水市区. Liupanshui as a prefecture governs the city of Luipanshui and the vast surrounding rural and less-urbanized areas consisting of four county (县) areas namely:

Zhongshan District (钟山区)
Pan County (盘县)
Shuicheng County (水城县)
Liuzhi Special District (六枝特区)

The term 'county' does not bear direct translation to the concept of 'county' in the UK, as you can see from the 'district' (区) nomenclature above, but actually refers more correctly to the administrative function - the rank of which is derived from the administrative level of the city.
Shuicheng county adminstrative centre is located in Shuicheng and is answerable to the adminstration in Luipanshui.
Sorry this is getting way too technical...

To directly address your question about
Quote:
Searching the web (again) I have found Wang Jun's website for CYTS see page http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/DOC_view.asp?LID=128&NID=170 which gives info on location and says that Nankai township is 50 kms north of Shuicheng. On my older Nelles map of Southern China (2000) I have finally found 'L. - Nankai' which is north of 'L. -Shuicheng' Liupanshui. I can't find anything on the map for 'L....'. Nankai is not shown on my 2005 edition of Nelles map of Southern China. See the map on the CYTS website http://www.gzcyts.com/en1/map.asp which shows Liupanshui (Shuicheng).

The "L." refers to Liupanshui prefecture (六盘水市). Remembering that in Chinese we go from biggest to smallest on the map, "L. Shuicheng" refers to the town of Shuicheng (so this reads as Shuicheng town, Liupanshui) whilst "L. Nankai" refers to the town of Nankai (Nankai town, Luipanshui). To add to the possible confusion/clarity Nankai town (南开) is in Shuicheng County (水城县), Luipanshui prefecture (六盘水市).
Regards
Iain


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 Post subject: Further map details
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:46 am 
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Pamela
You will also find that as time goes by the names of counties and districts disappearing. This is in line with the consolidation of administrative areas in China. I see for instance that you find Nankai on your 2000 map but not on your 2005 map. This may reflect that Nankai administration is now under Shuicheng as many district counties have been phased out. I doubt that this will continue further in Luipanshui as it is now streamlined down to just 4 county level administrative areas. To find this information out is quite difficult and it becomes a little confusing when referring to older references which speak of districts no longer in existence. All this illustrates the need to put out information timeously before it is lost. The appearance of place names on maps also reflects interest/importance and this may explain apparent discrepancies.
Regards
Iain


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 11:54 am 
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Iain

Very many thanks for the helpful naming lesson. Wang Jun always gives out names going from the village to township and on upwards and your explanation - with the characters for the places in the Liupanshui prefecture - is in line with this and very helpful indeed. This is an area that I would very much like to visit.

By the way, do you think that the wax resist in your carrier might be on hemp or ramie? I know this is an area which was very much a hemp area as the climate and terrain is suitable.

best wishes and thanks again,

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 2:20 pm 
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Susan Stem sent me a scan of from her Lonely Planet SW China guide of the map (p.243) showing Nankai. I could not find Nankai in my very out of date Lonely Planet SW China guide (1998). I had hunted for an updated version before my trip in 2005 but failed to get hold of the 2002 edition then. I have just found a used edition - 2002 I think - on Amazon.com although nothing on Amazon UK. Luckily there was one dealer of used books who would send internationally out of the US. Unfortunately LP do not seem to have updated since. A great shame as their China guide does not give the same level of detail in the area we are particularly interested in.

Many thanks Susan. I am sharing the map here with you all - and my thanks also to Lonely Planet!


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File comment: Lonely Planet SW China guide map from page 243
Mail-Map-showing-Nankai.jpg
Mail-Map-showing-Nankai.jpg [ 58.06 KiB | Viewed 12817 times ]

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 Post subject: Hemp or raimie
PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 9:09 am 
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Pamela, sorry I missed your question as I looked at the map. I am uncertain as to how to tell the difference between hemp and raimie with the naked eye. My understanding is that hemp, like linen, easily creases, whilst raimie does not? If this is indeed the case then the wax resist ground is possibly made from hemp as it does crease easily. However, I'm uncertain as to how this changes with weaving density so can't, at present, give you a definitive answer.
Iain


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