tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Sun Dec 17, 2017 4:17 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 2:48 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Just in case anyone thinks that I have abandoned Li textiles - quite the contrary!

I have not got to grips with organising a proper Li gallery but I did pull together a little gallery of a Ba sa dung Li blouse at the weekend when I was trying to compare some embroidery on the side of a blouse http://www.tribaltextiles.info/pacross/ ... use_01.htm I found it fascinating looking at the images being used in different Li embroideries. Perhaps one of the things which attracts 'western eyes' to the Li textiles is the use of a range of images throughout their textiles which suddenly start to leap out at you when your eye begins to get trained to find them.

If only I can get a chunk of time I can really get to grips with building up a resource of Li photos.

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: More Li
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2005 3:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Pursuant to Pamela's request I am attaching photos of a Li skirt in my collection.

Bill Hornaday


Attachments:
li_skirt1-full_123_.jpg
li_skirt1-full_123_.jpg [ 63.34 KiB | Viewed 7420 times ]
Li skirt1-detailA.jpg
Li skirt1-detailA.jpg [ 80.88 KiB | Viewed 7427 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2005 10:42 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Dear Bill

Thank you very much indeed for sharing your very nice Meifu Li skirt. I particularly like these fine ikat skirts and the varied images in the ikat.

Coincidentally today is a 'Meifu Li day' for me as I have just 'adopted' a much valued Meifu Li skirt from another forum member and it arrived today. This evening I have been looking at the new (to me) skirt and comparing it with one already in my collection.....and then up pops yours on the forum. Hope don't mind but I have turned the photo of yours around as I think it would be worn. I was getting a stiff neck looking at yours and my two and also looking in my big Li book (Traditional Culture of Li Ethnic Group) for more on the Meifu. I also have a copy of an article 'Frogs and Ancestors: Textiles of the Meifu Li of Hainan' by Lee J Chinalai (also see a post by Sandie on the Chinalai Tribal Antiques on the Borneo Boccus thread a few days ago). The article was published in one of the catalogues of the major US tribal arts exhibitions.

Your (and my) Meifu skirts seem similar to skirts shown in the article which are dated as 'turn-of-the-century' Meifu Li skirts. (I assume that mean the turn of the century between 19th and 20th centuries).

You might be interested in a quote from the article (which is based on several references including the book I refer to above):
Quote:
"There are two main types of skirts. Later and more common skirts are eigher all in plain-woven bands with stripes of varying widths, or combine alternating stripes of plain cotton weave with one major band of supplementary weft: threads woven along and through the weft ground. Earlier and important ceremonial sarongs (Figures, 2, 3 and 4 - similar to yours, Bill) utilized the warp ikat method."


Re-reading this article I realise that I have an old (again turn of the century) Meifu Li headcloth which I now realise has natural threads of embroidery which tone beautifully with the skirts. I must take some photographs of the ends as it has Chinese script and I must post on Olivier's 'writing' thread.

Thanks again for post. I really will get down to sorting the photos into a gallery/galleries - if only I had some of that very precious medium - time!!

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Sun Apr 03, 2005 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2005 4:19 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I said that I would post a Meifu headcloth. This is embroidered. According to the Chinalai article which I quoted above:
Quote:
"Beginning around the end of the 19th century, and going into the early 20th century, Meifu women began to produce idiosyncratic, finely embroidered and often colorful headcloths that are exceptional for their abstract Chinese characters. (Figure 10) When available, these are still reserved for ceremonial wear today. The characters, difficult to read even for the Chinese, hold meaning individually and in groups. Read as a sentences they often express proverbs about the proper comportment for a woman or what her best behavior should be for success. It is probable that these headcloths were made and worn initially at a ritual for the passage of the Meifu girl into adulthood. The insertion of Chinese writing shows the influence of the Han Chinese culture on the Li, but may also reflect the impact of large, secret and highly ceremonial embroidered panels full of Chinese an imperial creatures, symbols and writing that were created by the Li beginning in the late Ming period and sent as tribute to the Court in Peiking. Headcloths for everyday use or of a later period are of the simple deep indigo and white striped plain-woven cotton rectangles..."


Attachments:
File comment: Meifu embroidered headcloth from the end of the 19th/beginning of 20th century
IMGP1582e.jpg
IMGP1582e.jpg [ 58.33 KiB | Viewed 7340 times ]
File comment: one of the embroidered ends of a Meifu headcloth - end 19th-early 20th century (the other end from the following photo)
IMGP1583e.jpg
IMGP1583e.jpg [ 52.95 KiB | Viewed 7340 times ]
File comment: one of the embroidered ends of a Meifu headcloth - end 19th-early 20th century
IMGP1589t.jpg
IMGP1589t.jpg [ 60.6 KiB | Viewed 7340 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Sun Apr 03, 2005 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2005 4:39 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Whilst we are talking about Meifu textiles I am going to post a Meifu tube skirt which, instead of being all ikat woven panels, includes a panel of embroidered cloth.

This week I have been exchanging emails with Marla Mallett in which we have been discussing how often embroidery is attributed as 'supplementary weft' This skirt is very much a case in point. The same Chinalai article to which I have been referring above, repeatedly talks about wide bands of both supplementary warp and weft. On my skirt there is no doubt that the supplementary threads in yellow and gold have been added by embroidery and not as part of the weaving process.

This skirt is probably roughly contemporary with the headcloth.


Attachments:
File comment: Meifu Li ikat and embroidered tube skirt
IMGP1551e.jpg
IMGP1551e.jpg [ 57.08 KiB | Viewed 7330 times ]
File comment: detailed of embroidered band on a Meifu Li ikat tube skirt
IMGP1546e.jpg
IMGP1546e.jpg [ 53.69 KiB | Viewed 7330 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Sun Apr 03, 2005 3:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2005 4:48 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Just to keep the Meifu flavour, I am also posting another Meifu tube skirt, similar to Bill's in that it is all ikat and, following my conversations with Marla, I think is 'warp-float patterning' (since it looks the same to me as weaving identified as such on the Ba-sa-dung (Run dialect) mini skirts.

This skirt is heavier and rather thicker than the one with the embroidery and I think that it has probably hardly ever been worn whereas the embroidered one has most definitely been worn and the cotton thread softened by wear.


Attachments:
File comment: Meifu Li ikat tube skirt
IMGP1527e.jpg
IMGP1527e.jpg [ 56.26 KiB | Viewed 7327 times ]
File comment: Meifu Li ikat tube skirt
IMGP1537e.jpg
IMGP1537e.jpg [ 51.36 KiB | Viewed 7327 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: New Li pieces
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 1:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
I just received these Li pieces in a trade and thought I would share my excitement. We are getting quite a gallery of Li pieces.

Bill Hornaday


Attachments:
li_skirt2_full023_365.jpg
li_skirt2_full023_365.jpg [ 70.4 KiB | Viewed 7276 times ]
li_skirt2_detail_026_209.jpg
li_skirt2_detail_026_209.jpg [ 75.38 KiB | Viewed 7276 times ]
li_shirt1_full020_125_.jpg
li_shirt1_full020_125_.jpg [ 57.7 KiB | Viewed 7276 times ]
Li shirt1 detail021.jpg
Li shirt1 detail021.jpg [ 68.52 KiB | Viewed 7288 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 11:06 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Bill,

Very many thanks for 'sharing'. I think that your phrase 'thought I would share my excitement' sums up what to me this forum is all about! When we post fine textiles from our collection - especially the new ones - it is sharing the excitement which is key. Finding those who can appreciate these gems may take several thousands of miles but, linked by the internet, just a few blinks in time!

Couple of nice pieces here. Your Run dialect, (Ba-sa-dung Li) blouse is an interesting one. Two rows of embroidered outlines - with some interesting birds, I think, in the top row above the solid in embroidery band in front (and I would presume back). This would appear to be a piece(s) possibly re-used from an older blouse - something that we often see in Li clothing. First time I have seen two embroidered doodles (possibly chickens?) at the base of the nexk 'V'.

A very nice Ha Li skirt with a good procession. I like the animals being walked along with riders (even if they do look like tables with tail at one end, head at the other.) I have one of these on my similar skirt and the quirky look just appeals to me!

I like the idea of textile exchange since collecting is such a personal thing with one person preferring particular types and techniques (also means that you get to own a broader collection albeit on a rolling basis!)

Yes, we are getting a really nice collection of Li textiles together thanks to everyone's contribution - a growing showcase of these fascinating textiles! Many, many thanks to you all!

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 7:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
One of the interesting things I discovered about the Ha Li skirt is that the processional figures are not completely embroidered as I had presumed. The body of each figure is comprised of supplimentary weft threads or in reality supplimental weft floats. Then with the basic figure woven into the cloth the figure is outlined in simple embroidery. A very unusual technique that has a great effect when looked a closeup. Has anyone seen this technique used by another group?

Bill Hornaday


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 9:54 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Bill

I am posting two photos of details from front and back of a Ha Li wedding skirt in my collection which I have posted in full elsewhere http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... =1223#1223 . I think that this illustrates your point. In the case of the photo of the front of the procession motif you can see the supplementary weft threads floating on the surface and also buried in the warp-faced weaving. The motifs have been outlined with finely embroidered chain stitch. In the photo of the detail of the reverse of the Ha Li wedding skirt it is just possible to see hints of brown weft threads buried in the indigo warp threads. See reverse of outline chain stitch embroidery of procession motifs.

I thought that I had seen a similar supplementary weft work with floating threads on another, much rougher, skirt in my collection. However, when I looked closely at the 'supplementary weft' threads on the reverse of the work, to me it looks very much as if the motifs have been embroidered, not woven. There is no outlining chain stitch embroidery. See the skirt at http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... =1224#1224 I have added 2 details of the reverse side of 2 of the motifs to the earlier post at the link.


Attachments:
File comment: detail of front of procession motif on a Ha Li wedding skirt. Note the supplementary weft threads floating on the surface and also buried in the warp-faced weaving. The motifs have been outlined with finely embroidered chain stitch.
IMGP1834e.jpg
IMGP1834e.jpg [ 66.52 KiB | Viewed 7250 times ]
File comment: detail of reverse of Ha Li wedding skirt showing hints of brown weft threads buried in the indigo warp threads. See reverse of outline chain embroidery of procession motifs
IMGP1836e.jpg
IMGP1836e.jpg [ 63.38 KiB | Viewed 7250 times ]

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group