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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:32 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:18 am
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Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hi everyone! This is my very first post. My name is Adline and I'm an Assistant Curator at the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia. I've been with the museum for 5 years and in that time have developed a specific interest in textiles. I was conducting some research for our next publication when I came across this forum. I am currently curating an exhibition on Central Asian ikats and I would love to share it with you. If you'd like to have a virtual tour, try this link:

http://www.kodakgallery.com/ShareLandin ... share&Ux=0”target=_blank


Last edited by adline76 on Fri Jul 07, 2006 8:21 am, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 11:32 am 
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Adline,

Welcome to the www.tribaltextiles.info/community forum! You are very welcome indeed!

I have tried the link you gave in your post but unfortunately got the message from the Kodak EasyShare Gallery: 'The page you're looking for is not available'.

I have found the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia website http://www.iamm.org.my/main.php and some info on the exhibition. I am very sorry to see that the ikat exhibit ends on 28 July as I hope to be visiting KL in the last week in August and would have loved to have seen it. I have not visited the Museum before but will try and fit in a visit on my trip if this is possible.

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http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Last edited by Pamela on Thu Jul 13, 2006 11:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Abrbandi
PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 7:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:18 am
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Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Dear Pamela, thank you very much for the warm welcome :D
I am very fortunate indeed to have found this forum, I look forward to learning more about the world's fantastic textiles.

I am sorry the link didn't work... I've fixed it, so I hope it works now. I don't think you have to sign in to see it. How wonderful that you're coming over to KL. The ikat exhibition may have ended, but you can still view the ikats and other textiles in our permanent display. If you'd like a personal tour I'm around Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays (i work on mondays but the museum's closed). :mrgreen:

There are at least two more textile exhibitions in KL that you can see during your visit. Will tell u more about them later. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 9:54 am 
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Adline

Excellent! The link now works. A stunning exhibit - beautiful textiles (I have always been fascinated by these glorious central Asian ikats) extremely well presented. A wonderful sense of drama which so suits the ikats. You have a great space for the exhibit. It is excellent to see such textiles presented so well. Of course I cannot read the accompanying info but it looks as if there was good supporting material for the ikats.

I like your on-line 'show' as it gives a much longer life to the exhibition as well as supporting publicity whilst it is live. I will add a link to the main tribaltextiles.info website. It would be good to work up a page of info on access to textiles in KL as a resource something along the lines of http://www.tribaltextiles.info/Countrie ... ctions.htm which I prepared for Thailand.

Keep up the excellent work and do please keep us informed on the forum on exhibits you are aware of so that people can take advantage of textile exhibits in your part of the world.

I hope that we get the chance to meet next month.

Very best wishes,

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http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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 Post subject: Ikat
PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:54 pm 
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Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Asalaam alaykum Adline-
I, too, wish I could see the glorious exhibition of ikats at your museum; from the photos, the presentation appears to be appropriately dramatic and the collection a feast for the eyes.

I'm curious about the white sleeveless 'cloak' in the fifth photo from the right in the first line of thumbnails: it appears to be worn on the head, much like the well-known 'chyrpys' of the Turkoman people- is that a woman in the old photo shown beside the textile? The reason I ask is that I have a piece exactly like that and it fits my husband perfectly as a cloak on his shoulders; we never even considered that it was for a woman! What cannot be seen in the photo is that the outside is white, moire silk; the inside is lined in a very colorful ikat silk, in the same colors as yours. Do you happen to know the source of this piece? We acquired ours in Saudi Arabia, and like many textiles that come there, it was probably brought by a hajji coming for pilgrimage, tho we're not sure.

We will all look forward to more of your posts-

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http://www.tribaltrappings.com
http://tribaltrappings.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Parandja!
PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:04 am 
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Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Dear Susan,

Waalaikum salam! Boy, your post certainly got me all excited! I can talk about the textiles in the exhibition for hours on end :P

The piece you identified is called a "parandja" (sometimes called "faranji"), a traditional cloak worn exclusively by Central Asian women. It was a requirement for them upon leaving the household (where they were mostly confined), much like a burqa is worn in Afghanistan.

Parandjas were certainly worn over the top of the head. They are very often coupled with a heavy horsehair veil to conceal a woman's face. They have lovely vestigial sleeves around the back (as I'm sure your piece has too!). In that respect, yes, they are very much like the Turkmen's "chyrpy" (which we also have in the exhibition).

Ours is white and woven with a silk warp and cotton weft, which gives it a ribbed effect. The moire effect you see on most silk warped and cotton wefted Central Asian fabrics are created by the beating of the fabric with a convex wooden mallet over a convex wooden surface. This is done after the cloth has been woven, sometimes there is an egg white finish to them that makes them extra shiny.

As you've described, the interior of "parandjas" are usually the opposites of their austere exteriors. Like the one in your collection, ours is also lined with brightly coloured and boldly patterned ikat. These parandjas were all occasion costumes, worn at weddings and funerals. Because they were lined in precious ikats they were mostly worn by the wealthy.

The library of Congress has a copyright free online collection of Prokudin Gorskii's turn of the century photos. Here's the link to his parandja shots:

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/f?p ... p/~pp_3eXe:

In case the link fails, I've attached the images here for your viewing pleasure. You can get the high-res versions on that website :)

BTW, all the textiles we have in the exhibition are from the 19th century.

:D I'm so happy to share!! Talk to you again soon!


Attachments:
Parandja2.jpg
Parandja2.jpg [ 72.52 KiB | Viewed 12687 times ]
parandja1.jpg
parandja1.jpg [ 48.33 KiB | Viewed 12688 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 2:27 pm 
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Location: Austria / Europe
Hello and Asalaam alaykum to everyone and esp. Adline,

thats a very nice and beautifull presentation of Ikats and other things. Also your picture presentation is very good and gives a good impression of these things - especially for one who is not able to see it "in situ".

Two remarks: your pictures enclosed in the post above (parandja 1+2); beside i found it very amazing to see these robes worn ABOVE the head (wow - how comes? is that common in general or just with these particular ones - never seen that before) BUT the pictures itself are REALLY COOL :shock:
That´s what i would call modern ethnographic pictures...
Really like them!!

Secondly; a year before we (or rather my partner) did the loaning for the "moroccan charm - art of the berber tribes" exhibition in Jerusalem (L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art) there was a big exhibiton of Ikats and other things as well (The Rau Collection - Silk fabrics from Central Asia).

Maybe you (and/or others) have seen it. I just have the catalogue here (which is always very well done by the curator Ms. Rachel Hasson) where you can also see a variety of different very good pieces.
If you ever have the chance to visit Jerusalem you should go there.

Otherwise happy to have you in this community
cheers and all the best from Austria
udo 8)

ps. your link didnt work with me (temporarly file open error)

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 Post subject: Parandja indeed!
PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 3:57 pm 
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Posts: 393
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Sawadee kha Adline-
Many thanks for the informative response to my questions. I could not get the link to work, so am glad that you included the photos. I just dug our parandja out of the closet and must say that to wear it on the head is really difficult- it wants to slide off! My husband looks much more comfortable in it (on his shoulders) than I ever could.

Upon closer examination of the weaving, I find the ribbed effect is such that the weft threads are completely covered: would this be considered a warp-faced fabric? The silk warp threads are much finer than the weft, but I'm not sure the weft is cotton- there's a bit of a sheen that I usually don't see with cotton ( I found an area with a bit of wear and could see both warp and weft with magnification) There is also a fine black stripe every 1/4"; otherwise it appears to be identical to yours, including the ikat edge liner. I'll try to take some photos to send you, or to post.

Who owns the textiles in your exhibition? Do you know the provenance of this specific piece? I cannot help but wonder if perhaps two sisters had identical parandjas made for themselves, or if the maker of these pieces made them all the same... very curious indeed.

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http://www.tribaltrappings.com
http://tribaltrappings.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 7:12 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
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The Prokudin-Gorskii Collection is a wonderful photo resource. I have hunted through and eventually found the 2 photos. They can be found in several ways (but not by searching on 'parandja'). I am putting a link in which may work - it works when I preview the post and then click it: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/f?p ... p/~pp_AxB8: (If this fails try Googling 'Prokudin-Gorskii Collection' and then searching on 'Sartianka. Samarkand')

Both photos are titled:
TITLE: Sartianka. Samarkand
TITLE TRANSLATION: Sart woman. Samarkand
and then their identifying numbers are:
CALL NUMBER: LC-P87- 8023[P&P] and CALL NUMBER: LC-P87- 8011A[P&P]

Adline, you are a star! Your phrase at the end of your post " I'm so happy to share!! " is absolutely in line with the aim of this forum so you are doubly welcome!!

Very best wishes,

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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 Post subject: Parandja
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:37 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:18 am
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Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Dear Udo, thank you for your warm welcome. I’m so glad that you enjoyed the virtual tour, I can’t take credit for the photo presentation, as it was prepared by our wonderful Display designer. Yes, those parandjas are amazing, who would have thought that they worn that way? Thank goodness for Mr Prokudin-Gorskii and his descriptive photos. I think parandjas were primarily worn by women in urban centres like Bukhara & Samarkand.

Although the women did not seem to enjoy much “freedom”, they are regarded as preservers of culture and heritage. In addition, because they confront childbirth, they are also believed to be healers. Women were relegated to the home, but their social contributions should not be undermined. At home, they would rear silk worms in their back yards, spin yarns, weave silk and cotton, produce fine embroidery and take care of the home and family. The fabrics they weave and embroider are made for their own use or to be sold in the market, so they could contribute to the family income. Many of Gorskii’s pictures taken in cities are of men, as the women were not seen much, even at the turn of the century.

Yes, I have seen the Rau collection’s catalogue; their collection is lovely. So is the Guido Goldman collection. For our project, I got in touch with Ms. Kate Fitz Gibbon and Andrew Hale, whom I consider “gurus” of Central Asian textile. They did extensive research on the Goldman collection.

And Susan, I wish I could reply to your greeting in Thai … but I don’t know how! So I’ll thank you in Malay – “Terima kasih!”. The issue of warp-faced fabrics is very interesting. I think the fabric can indeed be deemed warp-faced. In your parandja, I think it is very safe to say that the weft is cotton. The density of those fine silk warp threads are much greater than the weft, so that not only do they conceal the weft, but they are also much stronger and can stand up against the abrasive action of weaving. I would love to see pictures of your parandja, do post them when you can! The textiles in the exhibition are owned by our museum. I have seen other parandjas similar to ours, so I suppose they were all made relatively in the same fashion.

Pamela, thank you so much for saving the day by providing a “working” link to Prokudin Gorskii’s work! To think he caught these images before the development of colour photography. I do not know very much about photography, but apparently, he employed the use of colour filters when capturing the images. If he wanted to show the image in colour, he had to project the image onto a wall using a “magic lantern”.

Here’s more of the man’s fantastic work. It is interesting to see nomadic women wearing ikats (possibly on their wedding day) because ikats were made by settled peoples in big cities. I like to think that the nomads traded their tribal rugs for these ikat robes!


Attachments:
Ikat nomad 2.jpg
Ikat nomad 2.jpg [ 122.19 KiB | Viewed 12621 times ]
Ikat nomad.jpg
Ikat nomad.jpg [ 115.38 KiB | Viewed 12622 times ]
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 Post subject: Parandja
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 10:47 am 
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Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Terimakasih to you, Adline!

The yurt/wedding outfit photos were great! The observation that color filters were used is also quite interesting and suggests an early foray into color photography(?). I agree with Udo that the photographer's visual sensibility also is very modern; the Eugene Atget of Central Asia in a way. This is an eye-opening thread in several ways!

Now, here is our parandja, 'up close and personal'. I would be curious to know how the details compare to the one in the exhibition.


Attachments:
Mail-TCA116_Front.jpg
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Mail-TCA116_Back.jpg
Mail-TCA116_Back.jpg [ 60.24 KiB | Viewed 12555 times ]
File comment: two patterns of silk ikat
Mail-TCA116_Inside.jpg
Mail-TCA116_Inside.jpg [ 55.62 KiB | Viewed 12555 times ]
File comment: Detail of back collar embroidery in silk
Mail-TCA116_Back_Detail_1.jpg
Mail-TCA116_Back_Detail_1.jpg [ 55.07 KiB | Viewed 12555 times ]
File comment: Detail of connector for faux 'sleeves' on back
Mail-TCA116_Back_Detail_2.jpg
Mail-TCA116_Back_Detail_2.jpg [ 65.41 KiB | Viewed 12555 times ]

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:47 pm 
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Susan

Thank you so very much for carefully photographing your parandja. The detail shots bring to life your earlier comments and the photos of parandjas being worn. This has developed into a really interesting thread - thanks to Adline for starting us off and then sharing the link to the Prokudin-Gorskii Collection photos at the Library of Congress website.

Creating an informative resource like this is just what I have in mind for the website and the forum especially when it means that a textile in someone's collection can blossom through identification and knowledge shared.

On a personal level I have been attracted to central Asian ikats for many years and in my own home live with some pieces on the wall although I do not have a serious collection. Having them on the wall is not good for the textiles but it is for my spirits! If I was seriously collecting them I would not feel able to display them.

Thanks for the contributions!!

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 3:39 pm 
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Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Pamela (and Adline & Udo)- I'm glad you're enjoying this thread. It is good fun to have ongoing conversations about special pieces from our collections- I consider the textiles as windows into the cultures from which they come, and particularly like to learn more about the people who made and used them.

After posting the photos I was poking around the Web and came across some more information about Prokudin-Gorskii's incredible color images and how he produced them: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/pp/prokhtml/prokcolor.html I cannot thank Adline enough for bringing this amazing work to our attention.

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http://www.tribaltrappings.com
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 Post subject: Beautiful!
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 6:57 am 
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Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Dear Susan,

Thank you very much for sharing those pictures of your parandja. Wow, I see what you mean! It would seem to me that both our pieces are almost identical! We share all the common details:
- Decorative tassels in the front
- Vestigial sleeves in the back, complete with embroidered panel
- Black embroidered designs around the "neckline" and the front (like "pockets")
- Lining consisting of two ikat fabrics

I'm afraid I can't post pictures of our parandja here because the image is copyrighted by the museum. But I will send you a "pm" and post it there, so u can make your comparison. This has been a great discussion indeed! And on my first post too! I'm looking forward to more :)
Thanks everyone!


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