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 Post subject: Burial bib and jacket
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 3:05 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:30 am
Posts: 315
Here are the scanned images of the burial bib and jacket mentioned above.
The caption for the bib reads as follows:
Quote:
The bib is part of the costume used by the Miao for burial. It can be rather large, with a small apron attached to it. It is then referred to as a bib apron. This neckpiece is of black satin with red, yellow and white cotton fold applique panels and is lined in green cotton.

The caption for the burial jacket reads as follows:
Quote:
This funeral robe is black satin and has red, yellow and white cotton fold and tuck applique sections at the shoulders. It also has a green floral print lining.


Attachments:
File comment: Burial jacket. Reilly, T. (1987). Richly woven traditions: Costumes of the Miao of Southwest China and beyond. China Institute in America.
clip_image002.jpg
clip_image002.jpg [ 13.85 KiB | Viewed 3129 times ]
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 Post subject: Bib image
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 3:07 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:30 am
Posts: 315
Here is the scanned bib image.


Attachments:
File comment: Burial bib. Reilly, T. (1987). Richly woven traditions: Costumes of the Miao of Southwest China and beyond. p. 52.
burial bib.JPG
burial bib.JPG [ 428.17 KiB | Viewed 3126 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 3:08 am 
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Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 6:31 pm
Posts: 31
Location: NY
Thank you both so much! These are definitely the same designs. What does this imply about the textiles I have though, the green one especially isn't brand new. I assume that people were actually buried with these pieces (rather than they're just having some ceremonial use). ...this seems to imply that graves were disturbed and robbed? I also wonder if either of you have a sense of what a "pillow" would mean. Would a flat cloth count, or would of it been backed and stuffed before use- if in fact it these had been used- these don't seem to have been backed.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 9:33 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Andrea

I don't think that we are looking at burial robbery here. What I think may be the case is that, in a similar way that young girls make clothes ready for their wedding before a suitor is in sight, so women will make clothes for their (and their husband's) burial in advance of the event. In some cultures, I don't think I have heard it in the case of the Miao/Hmong, garments may be given by a future daughter-in-law to her new mother-in-law as one of the wedding textile gifts. This - as a fine textile - may be destined for funeral use. I think I have read of a skirt being given in this way amongst the Tai.

In the case of your clothing, it could be that times became hard and the precious burial clothes stored away were used as a source of money. It is in times of hardship that fine clothing, including heirloom articles, comes into the market place. You can identify where there may be a bad harvest by the sudden rash of textiles in Kaili. Your items probably came from refugee Hmong who moved out of Laos as a result of war. They would certainly have needed money to survive. War shakes out many fine textiles.

Some textiles used at the time of a burial may not actually be buried with the corpse although I would expect clothing worn by the dead person in the coffin to be buried with them. Textiles used as coffin covers when the coffin is awaiting burial may well not be buried with them.

I am not sure about your question of cushion covers - I wondered myself when I was typing out the illustration caption. The cover could have been made in advance and then would be made up into a cushion at the time of death by a family member. It would be much easier to store as a flat cloth. It might be that it is laid over a cushion to 'dress' it in the coffin. I wonder if another forum member can shed light on this?

Thanks for generating an interesting thread with your mystery textile

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
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