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 Post subject: Where from?
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 11:37 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
Posts: 39
Location: UK
Any ideas? It has two holes in it. I suppose one just has to live with it. I do not think it is old but it has been well used. I will try and get a close up with the camera being fazed.


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 Post subject: Close up.
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 11:53 am 
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Location: UK
I hope these help.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 6:04 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I see that no one has jumped in with any guess at origin. You did not say where you got the textile from so I assume that this does not shed any light on origin.

It looks a very modern piece to me - very designer/market driven. If my life depended on it - thank goodness it does not (!) - I would say Mexico or the US southwest as the colours look that way and possibly the design motifs.

Not much help at all I am afraid.

best wishes,

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 9:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
I agree that these are not tribal, but rather than Southwest US, I would think India or Pakistan imitations of Southwest designs probably created for a chain like Pier 1 or the like.

Bill


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 7:21 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
Posts: 39
Location: UK
Thanks for the info. A car boot find for a few pence.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 7:59 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2004 12:37 pm
Posts: 42
Location: Austria / Europe
hi

finland, sweden,...

just not sure wheter if they had such big weavings, i mainly know smaller examples but with pretty much the "same" design.

best
udo

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
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Location: UK
Elements of the design reminded me of Turkey or other or carpet making counties. The centre motif in the last picture? it has not been made on a machine loom.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 2:22 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:22 am
Posts: 65
Location: germany
HI,
Pamela mentioned those stacks of books we collect. I just found one I had forgotten, a German edition of Ann Hecht's "The Art of the Loom", a British Museum publication from 1989.
Chapter six describes "dhaka" cloth made by the Sherpas in Nepal that looks very similar in style and technique to Honey's piece. The description is of a supplementary weft fabric with illustrations suggesting that that supplementary weft is used for the whole cloth. My impression is that it they are just interlocking discontinuous wefts. One illustration is titled (translated) "New colour compostions and uses for dhaka cloth", suggesting that even back then the export market was influencing production. Certainly Nepal has become a source for designer products, also in pastel-like colours.

Larry


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 9:59 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Larry,

Well found! I too have a 1989 edition (in English) of Ann Hecht's book (there was a later one published in something like 2001). I think that you may well have made the correct ID.

I hope that Ann will not mind but I am posting 2 images from the book. I don't think that she will from my knowledge of her. (We were on the same trip to China led by Gina Corrigan in 2001 and we have met up a couple of times since at museum events. The great thing about Gina's trips is that they tend to attract textile experts as ordinary participants who then share their particular expertise on techniques with the group. I have sent her an email and it hasn't bounced back so hopefully she will get to see this thread.)

I know now why these images seemed to ring a bell in the back of my mind. The similar style is used in the traditional headcovering topi of a man in Nepal. Ann, on page 155-157, 'Weaving' gives a detail description of the weaving, including warping, of dhaka cloth. I am reminded what an excellent book this is.

Ann says of the weft technique:
Quote:
The intricate inlay patterns are woven with stranded embroidery thread, and are laid in with each row of the ground thread. As many as a dozen separate bobbins of embroidery thread may be used at the same time, spaced across the warp. After opening the shed and inserting the ground weave shuttle, but not taking it right through, the weaver lays in the various supplementary wefts, each put in from the same side as the ground weave and taken out at the designated place to rest on the surface. The shuttle is then taken right through the shed and the wefts collectively beaten into place by the reed in its batten.............."


Thanks very much, Larry, for this contribution!


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File comment: page 155 from 'The Art of the Loom' by Ann Hecht. Fig 134 Contemplating the next move, a stranded embroidery thread in each hand.
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File comment: page 143 from 'The Art of the Loom' by Ann Hecht. Fig 123 New colour schemes and new uses for dhaka cloth.
p143AHecht-Loom.jpg
p143AHecht-Loom.jpg [ 75.46 KiB | Viewed 7475 times ]

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2007 11:13 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:15 pm
Posts: 39
Location: UK
How very helpful thank you. Incidentally I happen to live in a town called Aldershot the home of the British army, the Gurhka's were stationed only a mile or two down the road and subsequently here in Aldershot there is a sizable Nepalese community.


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