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 Post subject: Mandaya Textiles
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Here are some more examples of Mandaya textiles. This is a two panel, tube skirt which has been opened out flat. The two panels were woven as one piece of cloth with mirror images. This was cut in half and the two pieces joined at the selvedge and then sewn into a tube. The ikat motifs are the most common ones found on Mandaya, abaca, ikat skirts and probablly represent an ancestor figure and a crocodile.

Panels are often sold separately but two are required to make a complete skirt. The colors in older skirts are all natural and subdued while more recent pieces often have green and orange chemical stripes, sometimes in cotton rather than abaca. Little variety is found in the ikat motifs so Mandaya textiles are easy to identify.

MAC


Attachments:
File comment: Two panels joined at the center.
2010 05 30 #0005 Mandaya Woman's Abaca Ikat Skirt, Opened.jpg
2010 05 30 #0005 Mandaya Woman's Abaca Ikat Skirt, Opened.jpg [ 245.49 KiB | Viewed 9110 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0008 Mandaya Woman's  Abaca Ikat Skirt, UP-2.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0008 Mandaya Woman's Abaca Ikat Skirt, UP-2.JPG [ 113.27 KiB | Viewed 9110 times ]
2010 05 30 #0011 Mandaya Woman's Abaca Ikat Skirt, UP-1.jpg
2010 05 30 #0011 Mandaya Woman's Abaca Ikat Skirt, UP-1.jpg [ 150.13 KiB | Viewed 9110 times ]
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
This is one long piece of cloth which was never cut and sewn into a skirt and appears as new though the colors indicate it is an older piece. It has all geometric ikat patterns which are quite clear for a Mandaya textile. There are a number of subgroups among the Mandaya and this textile, with its regular, repeating, geometric motifs may be from a different subgroup and is less common than the skirts with the figures and crocodiles.

MAC


Attachments:
2010 05 30 #0024 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth, Uncut.jpg
2010 05 30 #0024 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth, Uncut.jpg [ 153.34 KiB | Viewed 9101 times ]
File comment: At the top of this photo you can see the plain center area between the mirror patterns which is the center of the long cloth.
2010_05 30 # 0017 Mandaya Woman's,  Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth, Uncut.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0017 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth, Uncut.JPG [ 147.64 KiB | Viewed 9101 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0020 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0020 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth.JPG [ 132.77 KiB | Viewed 9101 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0021 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat  Skirt Cloth, Close-up.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0021 Mandaya Woman's, Abaca, Ikat Skirt Cloth, Close-up.JPG [ 133.07 KiB | Viewed 9101 times ]
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 Post subject: A Mandaya Woman's Blouse
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:56 am 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Here is a typical Mandaya woman's blouse. It is made from commercial cotton and decorated with embroidery. The red body and blue sleeves and hem are the norm. The embroidery appears mostly on the sleeves and back and is characterized by its intense use in rigid, framed areas or panels.

Note the tufting at the shoulder seams and on the sleeves and along the seam at the bottom of the body where the blue hem has been added. This tufting is a typical characteristic of the Mandaya. The collar, cuffs and hem have an added piece of cloth for strength which is sewn on with a decorative stitch.

This type of blouse is probably typical of the 20th C. after efforts to convert the Mandaya by Christian missionaries. In the 19th C. blouses were probably less common, made of abaca and worn only for ceremonial occasions.

Best regards, MAC


Attachments:
2010_05 22 # 0189 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Front.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0189 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Front.JPG [ 31.61 KiB | Viewed 9075 times ]
2010_05 22 # 0201 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Back.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0201 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Back.JPG [ 32.97 KiB | Viewed 9075 times ]
2010_05 22 # 0201 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Back, Close-up.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0201 Philippines, Mindanao, Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Back, Close-up.JPG [ 66.91 KiB | Viewed 9075 times ]
2010_05 22 # 0196 Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Close-Up, Sleeve.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0196 Mandaya Woman's Blouse, Close-Up, Sleeve.JPG [ 87.02 KiB | Viewed 9075 times ]
2010_05 22 # 0209 Mandaya Blouse, Close-up, Back.JPG
2010_05 22 # 0209 Mandaya Blouse, Close-up, Back.JPG [ 74.65 KiB | Viewed 9075 times ]
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 12:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
These are not nearly as common as women's blouses but have the same characteristics of tufting and added borders with decorative stitching. This one is made of abaca dyed by the warp ikat technique and has patterns similar to the long uncut abaca ikat cloth that I posted above.

Best regards, MAC


Attachments:
2010_05 30 # 0029 Mandaya, Man's Abaca Jacket.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0029 Mandaya, Man's Abaca Jacket.JPG [ 158.59 KiB | Viewed 9067 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0038 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Back.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0038 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Back.JPG [ 194.56 KiB | Viewed 9067 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0044 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0044 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket.JPG [ 135.41 KiB | Viewed 9067 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0046 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Seam Tufting.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0046 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Seam Tufting.JPG [ 146.58 KiB | Viewed 9067 times ]
2010_05 30 # 0049 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Back.JPG
2010_05 30 # 0049 Mandaya Man's Abaca Jacket, Back.JPG [ 137.43 KiB | Viewed 9067 times ]
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 2:54 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:33 am
Posts: 155
Location: Beijing
Lovely textiles, MAC

The lozenge shapes have some similarity with motifs Sikka ikats from Flores that i saw during the summer. Here is a photo of one, from a tubeskirt woven in 2008-2009. It is said to represent a "flowerbasket" by the weavers there. Notice the way the sides of the lozenge curl over where they meet at the at the center, in the same way as the lozenges in MAC's photo #21. This photo has the warp direction running from top to bottom.


Attachments:
File comment: detail from a Sikka tubeskirt, Flores
SikkaFlowerBasketMotif.jpg
SikkaFlowerBasketMotif.jpg [ 137.53 KiB | Viewed 9024 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:53 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:33 am
Posts: 155
Location: Beijing
another piece of ikat, presumably woven in Mindanao (?)

this one seems to have been used as a hanging of some kind. It has small brass bells on it, which should be visible in the second photo. Texture is stiff, almost wiry, even though it is dyed with muted colors and seems to have some age. I haven't handled other palm fiber/abaca pieces so I can't tell if this is typical.

It came from Kalimantan, but I don't think it originated there. It doesn't look like Kutei textiles (referred to in another post in this thread). So I assume it was made in Mindanao and then traded.

Has anyone else seen pieces used like this with small brass bells attached? I am wondering if they are integral to the cloth or if they were added later. Curiously the thread used to attach them looks the same as the red-brown thread in the main cloth so I am wondering if they were attached by the cloth's original weaver.


Attachments:
File comment: one of the little bells
KT38-03t.jpg
KT38-03t.jpg [ 72.66 KiB | Viewed 8901 times ]
File comment: ikat hanging, the top finished by folding over and sewing with signs of attachment points.
KT38-01t.jpg
KT38-01t.jpg [ 115.42 KiB | Viewed 8905 times ]
File comment: detail showing three motifs, similar to previous postings in this thread of Mindanao abaca ikat
KT38-02t.jpg
KT38-02t.jpg [ 73.39 KiB | Viewed 8905 times ]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:29 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Chris, It looks like a piece of Mandaya, abaca skirt cloth to me. It has typical patterns and layout. Yes, abaca is generally stiff and somewhat rough, expecially Mandaya abaca. Some pants for men from the B'laan and some skirts from the Bagobo can be very soft from wear. There is a lot of trade from Mindanao to Borneo through Sulu and Tawi Tawi so I am not surprised that abaca from the Mandaya might be found there. Bells are common among the Mandaya, Bagobo and T'boli but are generally used on bags, belts or betel container straps. Don't remember seeing them on a skirt cloth.

Gotta run, best New Year's regards to all, MAC


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 Post subject: ID of mam Pamela's Dress
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 9:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:06 am
Posts: 2
Location: Philippines
Dear mam Pamela,

Greetings from the Philippines!, i'm a newbie at this forum though i have been collecting and immersing myself with the indigenous groups of the Philippines from where most of my collection came from... Have seen the two picture of blouses you post and i disagree that it is a T'boli dress, they are from the B'laan of General Santos/ Saranggani from Mindanao for the following reasons:

1. Though the patterns off the T'boli and B'laan are almost visually identical (since by tradition they came from a single ancestor), T'boli dress avoid spaces between the designs which make them look compact

2. The designs in the blouse are of B'laan origin

3. It is very rare to see the sleeves of T'boli dresses to contain appliques of circular bands clustered together, that tradition are of B'laan origin

before i did immersion on the B'laan indigenous group, i would have mistaken the dress as T'boli myself... See the fb page of Ms. Helen Lumbos as well as the site below for the dresses of the B'laan people

http://lamlifew.weebly.com

Hope this help!

P.S. Do add me up in Fb my name is Baylan Haraya


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Hello Baylan Haraya - Welcome to the forum!

Very many thanks for the information about my blouses. I am very grateful indeed for your informed comments and to know that they are B'laan and the reasons that you have determined this.

Best,

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


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