tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:55 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 7:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2005 8:56 am
Posts: 1
Location: Brussels
Hello,

I'm new to the list and I'm joining you as I hope someone some day can give me a piece of information about my daughter's past.

I'll introduce myself and explain my request. My name is Marie-Anne and my husband and myself are the happy parents of two beautiful daughters, aged 4 and 1.5 adopted from China. w My request is related to my eldest daughter as we have a bit of information that might be a clue to her past.

When we adopted her in December 2002 we were given the clothes she was found with. Among there is a little hat which puzzled me immediately, as I thought it might be related to her ethnic background or to a community living in the location she was found. Mulan was found at the beginning of the year 2002, in Guixi Town, DianJiang County, Chongqing. The hat she was found with can be seen in attachment (Hat Mulan). It's a plain white cotton hat, handmade except for the embroidery that looks machine-stitched.

I forgot about this but my curiosity aroused again lately when I learned that an other litlle girl, adopted in USA, found at the same place and at the same time, was found with the same hat, except for the embroidery pattern (see attachment Hat L) . Her mother also told me that they had the opportunity to visit Guixi (the finding location of both our daughters), and that they saw a lady carrying a baby wearing again the same kind of hat. She noticed that the lady carrying the baby did not look Han (see Attachment).

I'm trying to find out whether these hats are merely local handcraft, or whether they are linked to an ethnic background, and in that case which one. I often wondered whether this might be every days' handcraft from the Miao people. Both our daughters have very soft, wavy dark browh hair, but one is very tall and the other very small.

I know my query is a difficult one and only people having travelled in that region or with a huge expertise in Sechuan handcraft can help me. I'm very thankful in advance to anyone who could give me a bit of information or redirect me to other sources of information.



_________________
Marie-Anne
Mother to two lovely daughters adopted from China


Attachments:
hat_l_442w.jpg
hat_l_442w.jpg [ 36.3 KiB | Viewed 4224 times ]
hat_mulan_810w.jpg
hat_mulan_810w.jpg [ 53.14 KiB | Viewed 4224 times ]
Women and baby with hat.jpg
Women and baby with hat.jpg [ 31.75 KiB | Viewed 4224 times ]

_________________
Marie-Anne
Mother to two lovely daughters adopted from China
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 5:44 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
I think that is difficult to make a positive indentification of this charming hat to a particular group in China. Cross-stitch is quite ubiquitous. It is quite possible that it could have been stitched by Han Chinese. There seem to be some propitious symbols.

Clearly the hat has been stitched with love to protect the head which is such an important part of any baby.

I will be interested to see if anyone can supply any more positive ID for Marie-Anne.

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 1:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:52 am
Posts: 162
Location: California, USA
I think I have an answer to where these little girls are from. They have to be Han Chinese, because Hans are the only group limited to one child per family by the cental Chinese government. Minority groups have not had to observe this stricture, designed as a birth control measure to try and slow China's birth rate .

95% of orphans in Chinese orphanages are little girls, and only girls can be adopted overseas, since the Chinese are totally obsessed with boys, Unfortunately, their society is now paying the price! There are now 1.25 females to every male, and young men are very unhappy, and despondent about ever finding a wife, as young women are getting more demanding about money and looks. The only good thing about the little girls is they are no longer killed at birth or thrown away to die.

SEasia does not share the male obsession with either India or China. The Thai prefer girls, much like cultures in the west, because they believe girls are easier to raise. And, when things get tough, their daughters could always be sold into prostitution.

_________________
Sandie


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: China's one child policy
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2004 7:45 am
Posts: 142
Unfortunately Miao people and undoubtedly some other ethnic groups in China share with the Han a preference for male babies.
Miao girls are abandoned too. Not because the family has to abandon them, but because they cannot afford them and they only want boys. Economics as much as politics dictates peoples choices.
One of my dear Chinese friends in Guizhou has a Miao daughter who was found left in a box.
Only four months ago in a remote part of Taijiang County a grandmother wanted to give me (a man she had known five minutes) her nine month old granddaughter whose father had died in a car accident that month.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group