tribaltextiles.info

It is currently Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:11 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2005 2:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:52 am
Posts: 162
Location: California, USA
Hi folks,

Here are some "interesting questions", many of which I'm not sure how to answer, and take no responsibility for. Put your answers here, but not all of them need be answered, of course.

You can also email your comments to me at:

slshamis@aol.com

1. Arakanese male textiles share what characteristic with Li female attire?

2. What mainland SEAsian ethnic group does batiking? Is the technique similar to Indonesian batik?

3. Who were the first people employed in the "weaving village" created by Jim Thompson in Bangkok?

4. What Indic textile has influenced textile design throughout SEAsia?

5. Queen Sirikit just compled her sixth cycle. What is the name of her organisation to promote Thai crafts?

6. Why do some Buddhists refuse to keep silkworms for weaving?

7. How do T'ai and Khmer looms differ?

8. What is Songket, and where is made?

9. Name at least two places in SEAsia where (frog) figures have their hands pointing downward?

10. What are aniline dyes, and how are they used?

Extra Credit: We have been concerned with identifying textiles, based on the individual characteristics of various ethnic groups throughout SEAsian. Let's look at this cunundrum a bit differently.

Name at least five characteristics which appear unique to most of SEAsia.

Good luck! Sanuk to all!

Sandie


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2005 9:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 1:42 pm
Posts: 1989
Location: Canterbury, UK
Sandie

I have just answered several of your questions and then lost my response!! :(

So, trying again a few I can do with minimum effort and research!

Quote:
2. What mainland SEAsian ethnic group does batiking? Is the technique similar to Indonesian batik?
Several sub-groups of Miao/Hmong, also at least one Bouyei group in Shitou, Huanggousu township, Zhen Nin county, Guizhou province and a Yao/Mien group in Vietnam (Dao Tien). Oh, and also the Gejia if you accept their assertion that they are a separate group from the Miao. The technique is both different and similar in that the 'wax knife' in China is somewhat different in design from the canting in Indonesia (and certainly the cap metal stamp which may used to created quicker batik in Indonesia). However, both wax knife and canting are metal receptacles to hold wax or other similar resist fixed onto a wooden handle There are also differences in that sometimes a quill or bamboo switch is used in China and it is not always wax but may be gum from a tree. Actually lots of nuances in the answer to this question as you get into the detail of the different groups and their methods.

Quote:
3. Who were the first people employed in the "weaving village" created by Jim Thompson in Bangkok?
The people of Ban Krua (an impoverished canal-side district, in Bangkok I think) who were Muslim Chams, the descendants of prisoners of war captured in Cambodia more than a hundred years before. See http://www.cpamedia.com/history/jim_tho ... silk_king/ for a very informative article covering this - thanks Sandie for setting me hunting for this as it was something of which I was unaware.

Quote:
4. What Indic textile has influenced textile design throughout SEAsia?
Do you mean Indian patolas - double ikat?

Quote:
5. Queen Sirikit just compled her sixth cycle. What is the name of her organisation to promote Thai crafts?
Foundation for the Promotion of Supplementary Occupations and Related Techniques, popularly known as SUPPORT

Quote:
6. Why do some Buddhists refuse to keep silkworms for weaving?
Is it because in the process of obtaining the silk from the cocoon the silk pupae has to die?

Quote:
8. What is Songket, and where is made?
Songket is woven in Malaysia. It has silk warp and weft with supplementary weft which is gold metal thread.

Quote:
10. What are aniline dyes, and how are they used?
They are chemical oil based dyes. The first one discoverd was a bright mauve. Not sure quite what answer you are looking for here.

That is me washed up for now! There are some questions that I have not attempted and, no doubt, Sandie will take issue with some of my answers.

Over to the rest of you.....

_________________
Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2005 1:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:52 am
Posts: 162
Location: California, USA
Pamela,

I salute you. You are our number one ace on tribal textiles, although we all know that anyway.

So as the fog turns the Bay Area into a very damp, windy place, I now proceed to take a break fom writing a lecture about Vygotski's theory of mind, to comment on some of the questions:

1. The Li of Hainan and the Arakanese of Burma divide the textile space into narrow weft stripes, which are filled with random and simple patterns.

4. You're right, it's the western India patola, which has influenced courtly dress and exchange clothes throughout SEAsia, for at least two hundred years.

7. The weft is larger, and the Khmer loom is also set up for twill effects.

9. South Sumatra, Hainan, and the Dong in South China.

10. For conservative weaving cultures throughout SEAsia, where, for example, weft size has remained the same for centuries, to have welcomed aniline dyes
so quickly and universally is a very interesting development.

thanks to all,

Sandie


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 12:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:22 am
Posts: 65
Location: germany
HI Sandra,
As a newcomer here, delighted to find an alternative to the now defunct Googe Answers, especially a site on textiles, I've dredged even older questions for entertainment.

From what I learned in Burma, Sandra was correct on no. 6: some Buddhists eshew silk because the worms in the cacoons have to be killed.

No. 10, aniline dyes:
They were and are just too easy to use. I expect that you know something about natural dyes: the source materials having to be gathered, dyestuffs and mordants extracted, etc., etc. Early aniline dyes looked like a cheap and quick fix, but they didn't "fix", fading, running ... In 19th century Persia, the death penalty was instituted for use of aniline dyes. In some areas - like Turkey - the people were delighted by the gaudy colors that were possible, however.

You might be interested in Harald Boehmer's book on natural dyes, "Koekboya", which discusses and describes many types of natural dyes used around the world.

Cheers, Larry


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group