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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 5:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 30, 2007 11:52 am
Posts: 72
Location: france
Bonjour à tous

here is a picture of a little skirt or loincloth that is said to be from ILongot tribe in Luzon island, Philipina

I Would have some info about this piece .

cordialement louis


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 6:35 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:05 pm
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Bonjour Louis,

you are correct on the fact its Philippine and from one of the Mountain tribes in Luzon, though its not from the Ilongot (who would wear pounded barkcloth loincloth) but . . .tararararom (drums). . . . .from the Apayao-tribe. There is a similar one depicted in a bit a rare book 'Philippine Costume' by J. Moreno on page 80. They are quite rare, though not many collectors of Apayao either ;-P.
They supposedly are worn on top of the indigocolored loincloth (by men) during festivities.

Hope this helps.

Wouter Kleiman


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 7:19 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 30, 2007 11:52 am
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Location: france
Thank you Wouter for thoses precisions about this curious costume piece.
I have added two better photographs that shows details of this skirt. I would appreciate if somebody would add some field pictures of the men wearing it....

Cordialement


louis


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:02 pm 
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Louis, little chance that people have such photos! As this tribe is located in the uppermost North of Luzon and were feared headhunters not many have and still visit those areas. I, myself have traveled quite far up but there's just nothing to 'visit' in their (Apayao) region and no places tostay either. But . . . .maybe if you google 'apayao' or 'itneg' or 'isneg' (last 2 are also confusingly used for a neighbouring tribe 'Tinguian') who knows.

Though thanks to your quick reply and me finished dinner, I had some time to make pics of the photos in the book. Honestly thats the only reference to the piece that I have aswell. I knew I'd seen it somewhere but nowhere else to be honest. Though the book is reliable (some renowned Phil.textile collectors like Roland Go have helped the book).

Greets, Wouter


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:06 pm 
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
P.S. THANK YOU LOUIS BY THE WAY FOR POSTING THE CLOSE UP PHOTOS! FORGOT TO ADD! QUITE INTERESTING. THE PATTERNS ETC DO FIT INTO THEIR CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS SO AM CONFIDENT THIS IS A MATCHING I.D.
The photos are perhaps a bit dark but I couldnt take them with flash as that would bounce of the shiny page.

Is there b.t.w. anybody else who reckognised this piece? Or can add any info? Am very curious myself.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 3:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:05 pm
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
.... >>>> Follow up;
As I happened to do some research I found this piece in the Penn.museumcollection in which it is claasified as 'uncertain' /Kalinga.
Thanks to Louis close-up we can see its similarities to his piece and savely say its also from the Apayao. Beautiful piece b.t.w.
Though I must say that on my old photos I have of Apayao tribesmembers they all wear some kind of white, long and broad, thin textile strapped around their waist n "cup". However there usually IS a difference between 'normal' wear and 'festivity'wearcloth. On the photos I have and know they all wear the white garment. But I am still confident of the origin ;->.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 5:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
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Location: Japan
Louis and Wouter,

I got out my Apayao box and took photos of some of my pieces which I will post for you. Still have a few pieces to photograph and may get to that tomorrow.

Concerning the loincloth end from the Penn. Museum Collection, I rather doubt it is from Apayao. All of the images I have seen of Apayao textiles have been basically indigo in color. A search for Apayao in google images produces many photos of Apayao wearing their textiles. The Penn. Museum collection does contain a few pieces labelled Apayao and they conform to the basically blue color scheme. The colors of the supp. weft threads are more typical of the Kalinga but Kalinga loincloths are not white and as far as I know don't have the extended fringes on the sides which is more typical of Ifugao loincloths but again they are not white either.

It is interesting to note that red, indigo, yellow and green threads of precisely the same colors or shades are found in the textiles of the Itneg (Tinggian), Kalinga, Ifugao, Kankanay and Bontok. I believe these threads were produced and dyed in the Ilocos on the west coast of Northern Luzon and traded up into the mountains to the various ethnic groups. Jenks in his 1905 work on the Bontok tells us "There are several varieties of breechcloths in the area. The simplest of these is of flayed tree bark. It is made by women in Barlig, Tulubin, Titipan, Agawa, and other pueblos. It is made of white and reddish-brown bark, and sometimes the white ones are colored with red ocher. The white one is called “so′-put” and the red one “ti-nan′-ag.” Some of the other breechcloths are woven of cotton thread by the women. Much of this cotton is claimed by the Igorot to be tree cotton which they gather, spin and weave, but much also comes in trade from the Ilokano at the coast. Some is purchased in the boll and some is purchased after it has been spun and colored. Many breechcloths are now bought ready made from the Ilokano."

Back to the Penn. loincloth end, I think it is either Itneg (Tinggian) or Kalinga. The Itneg are one of the only groups who wear predominantly white textiles. I have a number of Itneg textiles but don't think I have a loincloth. If it is Kalinga as labelled perhaps it is from the Itaves of Northern Kalinga or Tuao. Wouter, you have a white jacket posted in the shopping section that you describe as Northern Kalinga. The colors and patterns of the Penn. loincloth resemble those of the jacket. Do you have a loincloth from the same area? I have a number of these jackets as well but again don't think I have a loincloth. Anyway, here are a few of my Apayao textiles.

Best regards


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Apayao, Man's Breechcloth End or Bustle, Embroidered 037 Full,   2014-03-12.jpg
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Apayao, Mans Breechcloth End or Bustle, Embroidered, UP 035,  2014-03-12.jpg
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Apayao, Man's Breechcloth, Blue Cotton,  Red Tassels Perhaps Wool, Silk Embroidery,  039 Full Cloth,  2014-03-12 (2).jpg
Apayao, Man's Breechcloth, Blue Cotton, Red Tassels Perhaps Wool, Silk Embroidery, 039 Full Cloth, 2014-03-12 (2).jpg [ 234.09 KiB | Viewed 5679 times ]
Apayao, Man's Breechcloth, Embroidered with Tassels, UP 040,  2014-03-12.jpg
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Apayao, Man's Breechcloth, Embroidery, Cotton and Silk, Up of Threads 044,  2014-03-12.jpg
Apayao, Man's Breechcloth, Embroidery, Cotton and Silk, Up of Threads 044, 2014-03-12.jpg [ 362.87 KiB | Viewed 5679 times ]
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 3:08 am 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
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Location: Japan
Vigan on the west coast of Northern Luzon has a long history of trade with Borneo, China, Japan and India. Originally an island, before silting of the river joined it to the mainland, it was inhabited by Fujian Chinese traders who called it BI GAN or beautiful shore. When the Spanish came in 1574 Vigan had a population larger than that of Manila. Trade through the nearby port of Pandan brought silk, porcelain jars, crockery and other goods that were exchanged for gold, beeswax, and other products from the mountains. Gold from mines in the tribal areas of the mountains was used to buy cattle, pigs, rice, raw cotton, spun and dyed cotton thread. imported silk and finished textiles.

Though rare, silk was traded up into the mountains and found its way into the textiles of the wealthy elite. I have textiles from the Itneg, Apayao/Kalinga and Gaddang with luxury silk in them. Here are a couple of ceremonial Apayao women's skirts with silk embroidery.

Best regards


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Apayao, Ceremonial Skirt, Cotton Stripes, Silk  Embroidery, Half Cloth  079,  2014-03-12 (2).jpg
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Apayao, Ceremonial Skirt, Cotton Stripes, Silk Embroidered Joinery, UP  084,   2014-03-12 (2).jpg
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Apayao, Ceremonial Skirt, Cotton Stripes, Silk  Embroidery, Half Cloth 048,  2014-03-12.jpg
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Apayao, Ceremonial Skirt, Cotton Stripes, Silk Embroidery UP,  055,  2014-03-12.jpg
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:05 pm
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Hello Mac,
nice to 'talk' to you again! Wow you indeed have quite good textiles from the Kalinga etc too! Interesting to read about Vigan/Bigan. I have visited that place too; one could better call it 'bygone' now he he.

On the Apayao fringed skirt/loincloth end; I understand your concern and I share it as we cant just find an old photo of tribal members with such a piece (that one photo from the book is a loner and not too old). My experience is that that region between Tingian/Itneg and N.-Kalinga and Banao-Kalinga and Apayao is quite influenced by eachother.
Though still each tribe has its own 'typicallities' as Tinguian has more white cotton textile, N.-Kalinga more striped with black, red and yellow and the Apayao are in many ways very different from the forenamed tribes, not only their facial characteristics, but also their jackets, colors, used warshield etc etc.
It is actually that Apayao warshield that traditionally carries those painted red triangles. Those rows of 'loose triangles' used in the weft of the fringed skirt/loincloth and also the Penn.loinclothend point me to the Apayao. Although the choice of colors point to N.-Kalinga. Usually the N.-Kalinga or in cases the Tinguian only use triangles on the edges of textiles and not in the middle ('loose') ah except also on skirts but also in that case they start from lines/bands and not floating.

Well anyway it has become quite a specialistic discussion and I guess we/me can only try to solve from the point of 'cultureanalyse/understanding'.
Eventually I believe the pieces come from a specific area of the Apayao-tribe-region as they inhabit such a large area which is so very little tranversed (only near Vigan by Schadenberg and Van Overbergh).

P.S. I have very recently bought a basket which I dont reckognise, although it came with many East Kalinga items. Hopefully -although I realise this is a TEXTILE forum- you can tell me your opinion. As you clearly also know a lot about 'igorot' artifacts. See picture below.
(never seen such a basket before)

Thanks n greets Wouter (wish I could also include more textilephotos of example I own but they are made by proffesionals (for my coming book; expected in May) and are extremely high in MB and should need to resize them first.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:25 pm 
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Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
P.S. Mac, yes I have one or two N.-Kalinga loincloth and they are much more narrow than the example (quite stunning piece must say with those bloodred fringes!) you showed. They can be orangy of color with black lines and lines of black circles and many other patterned lines running in the lenghitude of the loincloth. Generally they always have strongcolored lines in the lenghitude and sometimes added embroidered vertical lines near the ends of the loincloth. Very different than the piece you showed.

Mystery huh! ;-D


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