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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 7:38 pm
Posts: 1
Location: Cape Breton, NS, Canada
On this tais feto from Timor Leste, purchased by a friend there in 2011, can anyone identify
what the letters NLDSKPBK might stand for? (The seller in the market had no idea herself.)


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Tais feto - Detail 1.JPG
Tais feto - Detail 1.JPG [ 146.69 KiB | Viewed 3345 times ]
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 2:18 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 7:22 am
Posts: 65
Location: germany
Just to spark discussion, assuming that the piece's weave and dimensions are those of a tais feto, it seems highly unlikely that it was intended to be used as such. Any indications that it was so used? The unusual Latin letters and obviously western-influenced vase and flowers suggest that the decoration was added to allow the piece to be displayed on a table or hung vertically. Is the decoration really in-woven? It seems more likely - to me - that it would have been subsequently added.

No help identifying the meaning of the letters, and too much "seems ..."

Larry


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 1:01 am
Posts: 246
Location: Japan
Tim, Letters in textiles of N.T.T. are usually a name or the initials of the woman who produced the cloth and sometimes her husband (possibly to be). I have a Sumba hinggi with the name of the owner ikated along the edge and initials are sometimes found in Sarongs of Rote and Timor.In the case of your textile there seem to be too many letters to be initials which are usually 2 letters for a first and Family name, 4 if it contains the initials of two people.

East Timor has been in political strife since about1985 when Indonesia invaded and occupied the eastern half of the island. Many resistance groups were formed to fight for independence and they all had rather long names that were simplified to a string of initials. I don't know the names of the many resistance and political groups but wonder if these initials could be those of one or more of them.

The East Timorese are proud of their hard won independence and the members of resistance groups turned political parties are eager to proclaim their affiliation. There aren't many bumpers to put stickers on so textiles would seem to be a good, common, very visible medium to advertise in.

I would think the floral patterns and letters are done in the Buna technique, discontinuous supp. weft inserted at the time of weaving. A bit of research on the names of political parties might answer your question. Just a wild idea but perhaps worth some research.

Best regards,


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 5:49 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
Posts: 22
Location: sydney
Hi Tim

no idea what the letters stand for, but if not initials of names (yes they still have multiple names) possibly something religious.

Yes they are done in buna, so same on inside as outside. And Im sure they are duplicated on the other side of the sarong, so not for hanging on a wall. They are made by the Makasae and the patch of buna is usually a clan symbol.

Attached are three more examples & a Makasae dance performance in Baucau (in 2011) photographed by my colleague Frank Koehler.

Useful literature for Timor Leste textiles:

Anne Finch (editor) 2009, The art of futus. From light to dark. UNESCO.
Joanna Barrkman, undated (c2008) From the hands of our ancestors. Museum & Art Gallery Northern Territory, Darwin.
Jean Howe, 2009, Fundasaun Alola, a report to Alola foundation. http://www.alolafoundation.org/images/p ... f_Life.pdf

Hope thats useful.

Chris


Attachments:
Makasae dancers at Baucau.JPG
Makasae dancers at Baucau.JPG [ 73.21 KiB | Viewed 3189 times ]
makasae3 small image.JPG
makasae3 small image.JPG [ 41.26 KiB | Viewed 3189 times ]
makasae2 small image.JPG
makasae2 small image.JPG [ 39.2 KiB | Viewed 3189 times ]
makasae1 small image.JPG
makasae1 small image.JPG [ 38.35 KiB | Viewed 3189 times ]
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 12:25 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:52 pm
Posts: 22
Location: sydney
Just to add to my comments above.

Buna is an inappropriate word for the weft wrapping technique on those textiles, as it is an Atoni (or Dawan language) word; tetun is the lingua franca of Timor Leste, and the word is sui in that language (according to Yeager & Jacobson), but one of the books I cited (Barkkman 2008) described the technique as pa’a on that type of textile, and pa’a is presumably the Makasae word. The Makasae speak a Papuan language, not Malay language.

The dancers by the way, were performing for the official opening of the Baucau science teachers centre – the first in the country. That’s why theres a strange poster of human anatomy in the background. You cant hear it in the photo, unfortunately, but the music was supplied by a rock band on a rooftop!

Chris


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:56 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 10:28 am
Posts: 20
Location: Sunshine Coast , Australia
I have written to colleagues in Timor Leste for assistance with the initals...you never know.
Chris, Larry and Mac are all right in fleshing out provenance on your piece Tim.
The motif is strongly influenced by Portuguese. Flowers, Vases and Vines are not in Timor Leste's adat or traditional motif structure.
I have found it frequently in cloths from Oekussi in various forms and usually in Ikat. Some examples attached. Also attaching some of the signatures inside textiles from West Timor.


Attachments:
W1209a-.jpg
W1209a-.jpg [ 106.93 KiB | Viewed 3151 times ]
File comment: Here we have a classic Portuguese influence right down to the cherubs, vases, vines and flowers as well as a signature Next images in next post
W1209-.jpg
W1209-.jpg [ 110.2 KiB | Viewed 3151 times ]
w1237B-.jpg
w1237B-.jpg [ 117.21 KiB | Viewed 3151 times ]
File comment: One of a series of 4 weavings by Biboke weavers all with TP in the ikat for Yayasan Tefan Pa. A weavers co-op
W1236B-.jpg
W1236B-.jpg [ 144.18 KiB | Viewed 3151 times ]
File comment: Oekussi/Eban border
W1208a-.jpg
W1208a-.jpg [ 119.89 KiB | Viewed 3151 times ]

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Julie Emery
www.timortreasures.com
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 10:28 am
Posts: 20
Location: Sunshine Coast , Australia
Images cont.
Orange or yellow motif on black background are also popular in the area.
More soon ...I hope.
Blessings Julie


Attachments:
File comment: From the Manufui area TTU.
W1537-02.JPG
W1537-02.JPG [ 88.84 KiB | Viewed 3156 times ]
W1209b.jpg
W1209b.jpg [ 95.72 KiB | Viewed 3156 times ]

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Julie Emery
www.timortreasures.com
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