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 Post subject: Very Rare Tai Daeng Sin
PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 2:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
I thought I would post this unusual Tai Daeng Sin, which I haven't seen in books. I have three, but this is my particular favorite. While many of the Tai Daeng Supplemental weft pieces use irregular application of color, this particular style uses diagonal patterns of color over a repeated figure.

The top band is a Hua Buan, which is added to the sin of older women of high status. They are normally indigo, but I have a couple that are this faded grey/biege/pink. They are older pieces so ....

I believe this type of weaving is like a Sin Muk( sin with supplementary weft and supplementary warp as well as warp mut mi). According to Conners, these complicated pieces are given by the mother-in-law to the bride with the intention that the bride would were it to the Mother's funeral. This makes sense as these pieces are clearly done by master weavers and probably not someone in their teens. That may be the case with the Sin Mi I showed the other day. However, I go with the theory that the piece is for shamanic use as it is of such a rare quality.

I have another unusual piece to show, which has irregular use of color, and figuration similar to the sin I showed a coupe of months ago.

The poics are in reverse order. I don't know how to change their order. Soory [Bill, I have reversed them for you. Sorry that pics come out with most recent posted directly under post. Means you have to think in reverse when posting! Unfortunately when the forum was set up this was the way this was the order chosen. I could change it but unfortunately it means that all the previous posts will also change in order - and change the sense! The way I reversed these for you was to save all the photos to my computer then I went down the photos from the top photo as showing in the post and re-loaded it. I went on down all the photos so that I ended up with the first photo that you had posted. Nothing seems to change from the posting view but when you press the submit button and look at the post you will see that the order of photos has been reversed. Tedious but effective! Pamela]


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 Post subject: tai one on
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2004 2:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2003 6:34 pm
Posts: 393
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
Bill- Those are absolutely stunning! I've been reviewing the literature and haven't found anything that compares, tho Patricia Cheesman shows some closeups of similarly woven pieces. Thank you also, for showing a detail of the waistband- it is very handsome and also meaningful. Luckily, in this case it was left intact. The one on the second skirt appears too clean- might it have been a replacement (see quote below)?

To clarify for others, the body of the skirt is woven in one piece, except for the waistband(s) (hua sin) which are added on. Often a hempiece (tin sin) is also added, but it appears to be integral on these examples.

Patricia Cheesman discusses the importance and meanings of the waistbands some in her new book Lao-Tai Textiles.
Quote:
Waistbands were added to tube skirts to protect the main part of the textile and could easily be replaced when worn out. The colour and pattern of the main waistband (attached directly to the tubeskirt) often indicated marital status and provenance. This latter information is useful for ethnic identification purposes, but unfortunately the owners usually remove the original waistbands when tube skirts are sold because these parts of the garments are considered very private. It is believed that in the wrong hands, black magic could be performed on such personal items of clothing. Hua sin literally translated as 'the head of the tube skirt' has an interesting correlation to the human body.Lao-Tai peoples describe tube skirts as having heads (waistbands), bodies (main parts) and feet (hem pieces). Many old tubeskirts are sold with new white waistbands or any textile attached for trading as the original ones have been removed.


These are magnificent pieces- thanks for sharing!

_________________
Susan Stem

http://www.tribaltrappings.com
http://tribaltrappings.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2004 8:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Susan-
They do in fact remove the waist band, but I don't think they did in the case of the sin with the multiple human figures( frogmen, as the piece itself is extremely pristene. By the way these human figures are interesting for the "X" in their stomach. There is only a need to replace the waistband on the sin showing a ;little more use.The piece with the hua buan (?) I put a question mark as I know this was worn by an older woman, but at the same time it differs greatly in color and complexity( the one's in the books are markedly more simple) to the ones in the books. Maybe you will be able to find out since so many Tai experts pass through your domain. I have come across in the field numerous examples of perfectly preserved sin that have been passed over the generations. Likewise, many of the older pieces show substantial wear such as this piece with the Hoa Buan. Maybe Sandie can shed some light.

Bill
www.hornadayart.com


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 Post subject: pha sin etc.
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2004 8:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:52 am
Posts: 162
Location: California, USA
Hi Bill,

I have the "third eye" segment of a T'ai Daeng pha biang (cut of course for separate sale), with the same colors as the first pha sin you show. (Is yours silk or cotton? mine is silk with silk supplementary weft).

But I'm wondering about the attribution of the second pha sin. Their colors, especially the green, seem to speak to a different time and place. Also, the supplementary weft threads seem a bit thick for the T'ai Daeng.

Just quibbles really-they are superb.

Sandie


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2004 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:27 am
Posts: 124
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Sandie-
The first Sin is silk on cotton, but of course I usually expect that in a sin, but almost never see that in a phabiang, or at least a good one.

The second sin is silk on cotton. Looking at the green, I think in person you would see it is the same green as is frequently seen in Tai Daeng. On the other hand, I have never seen this style. The only thing I know is I bought it in Sam Neua and was told it was Tai Daeng. The silk is thicker, but could have other hypothetical explanations. Would like to see more before I came to a firm cconclusion. I agree it is a bit premature to tag it as Tai Daeng.


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