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PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2004 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2003 7:27 pm
Posts: 53
Location: USA
Hello All,

It's good to see that some of us textile freaks also like baskets, hats and beadwork. Thought I'd start this new thread with a Beaded Ceremonial Hat that I've had in my collection for a number of years. It was collected in Lampung, South Sumatra, Height 8", Diameter 16". Age unknown but assume early to mid 20th century. Thousands of beads decorate this rattan hat. Any additional information will be appreciated.
Best, Richard


Attachments:
hat.jpg
hat.jpg [ 43.08 KiB | Viewed 6672 times ]
hat2.jpg
hat2.jpg [ 53.58 KiB | Viewed 6672 times ]
hat3.jpg
hat3.jpg [ 44.36 KiB | Viewed 6672 times ]
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2004 9:39 pm 
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Location: Canterbury, UK
Richard

I thought this basket thing might catch on!!

Looks to me to have a strong Chinese influence - loosely 'Straits Chinese'. A very extrovert item and most definitely not to be ignored! Nice one.

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http://www.tribaltextiles.info
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 Post subject: beadwork on hats
PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2004 4:08 pm 
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On the beadwork on hats theme I am posting a photo of a small (12 cm diameter) beaded centre piece for a sun hat which I purchased in the late 1990s in Kuching, Sarawak. I think it is Kenyah. There is a much larger one - Fig 31, page 61 - in 'Sarawak Crafts: Methods, Materials and Motifs' by Heidi Munan in the Oxford University Press Images of Asia Series.

To link basketwork and beading I attach photos of a what I believe is a Kenyah babycarrier which had a beaded cover over basketwork and is trimmed with what I think are slices of bone or tusks (or perhaps shells?), teeth (or are they claws?) and cowrie shells. In the Sarawak Crafts there are examples which are named as both Kenyah and Kelabit (figs 13 and 27). I purchased the carrier in that great trading port in Sumatra, Medan, in the mid 1990s.

For a superb web exhibition of beaded panels as used on baby carriers and hats see forum member Mark Johnson's website: http://www.markajohnson.com/asiasale_ne ... anels.html I think that the exhibition is stunning - and Mark's text introductory text is very helpful.


Attachments:
File comment: baby carrier from Borneo with beading over basketwork and wtih various other applied decorations
BorneoBC2a.jpg
BorneoBC2a.jpg [ 50.24 KiB | Viewed 6649 times ]
File comment: Detail of baby carrier from Borneo with beading over basketwork and wtih various other applied decorations
BorneoBC1a.jpg
BorneoBC1a.jpg [ 55.67 KiB | Viewed 6649 times ]
File comment: Kenyah beaded centre of sun hat, Borneo (12 cm in diameter)
Borneo-(75)a.jpg
Borneo-(75)a.jpg [ 56.42 KiB | Viewed 6649 times ]

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
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 Post subject: Re: beadwork on hats
PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2004 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 7:35 pm
Posts: 175
Location: east coast
What fun this site is! I am learning so much and really enjoying all the postings.

I posted two pieces of beadwork under a new thread. But I should have read this thread first. Probably better here. [See http://www.tribaltextiles.info/communit ... .php?t=165 moderator]

Anyway, in response to the beadwork baby carrier, I am posting one with all shellwork which may fall not too far from beads. I also have several old shellwork jackets from Borneo but will post them under the jacket thread.

The shells on the baby carrier (and jackets) must be sliced from a larger shell (cowrie?). I have heard them referred to as "buri". There is an almost identical baby carrier pictured in: BEYOND THE JAVA SEA - Art of Indonesia's Outer Islands, which identifies it as Kenyah. It was definitely a "working" baby carrier. There is a tiny bit of (rat?) chewing on the seat where the baby must have done a little business. Sorry that the picture is not better. It is sitting on top of some shelves in one of my rooms at home.

And a post of a very ornamented Iban seating mat combining tiny beadwork and shell and fabric along with woven mat work. Some wear to the fabric parts. The white things at the ends are my feet holding it down because it had curled. I have to mount it flat yet.

Not sure if American Indian stuff should be included regularly because this site strikes me as devoted to SEA but I like comparisons and it is tribal I'll take some pictures of a child's beaded vest and a shoulder bag from the plains indians and post them later for comparion purposes.

I don't know much about Pamela's baby carrier but it looked at first as though the tops of the teeth or claws were serated somehow. The closeup helped straighten that out. An interesting illusion produced by the small hanging strings of beads? Looks like a nice authentic piece. There are now so many babycarriers being offered all over which are obviously made for tourists with plastic "teeth", etc. or new babycarrier with carvings out of ironwood which it is hard to imagine toteing around with a baby in it yet. I note that much Borneo "tribal" stuff is new and "antiqued" and coming up out of Kalimantan and the bazzars in Kuching are full of it.

Actually some of it is quite nice in its own right and maybe should be offered as and treated as "revival" work. There are still excellent craftsmen who can produce excellent work.

My thanks again to everyone posting such interesting and informative materials.

And I usually check out Mark's site frequently. Some nice materials there.

-John

Pamela wrote:
On the beadwork on hats theme I am posting a photo of a small (12 cm diameter) beaded centre piece for a sun hat which I purchased in the late 1990s in Kuching, Sarawak. I think it is Kenyah. There is a much larger one - Fig 31, page 61 - in 'Sarawak Crafts: Methods, Materials and Motifs' by Heidi Munan in the Oxford University Press Images of Asia Series.

To link basketwork and beading I attach photos of a what I believe is a Kenyah babycarrier which had a beaded cover over basketwork and is trimmed with what I think are slices of bone or tusks (or perhaps shells?), teeth (or are they claws?) and cowrie shells. In the Sarawak Crafts there are examples which are named as both Kenyah and Kelabit (figs 13 and 27). I purchased the carrier in that great trading port in Sumatra, Medan, in the mid 1990s.

For a superb web exhibition of beaded panels as used on baby carriers and hats see forum member Mark Johnson's website: http://www.markajohnson.com/asiasale_ne ... anels.html I think that the exhibition is stunning - and Mark's text introductory text is very helpful.


Attachments:
File comment: an ornameted Iban seating mat.
iban seating mat.jpg
iban seating mat.jpg [ 147.53 KiB | Viewed 6617 times ]
File comment: Kenyah baby carrier of buri shells.
figure baby carrier.jpg
figure baby carrier.jpg [ 90.62 KiB | Viewed 6617 times ]

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 Post subject: Beadwork Identification
PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2004 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 9:33 pm
Posts: 74
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA
Looking over these last images and the two John posted on another page, I thought I would add some additional information. The baby carrier Pamela posted is probably Kenyah, but may be Kayan. The Kenyah, Kayan, and Kelabit groups have very similar motifs, so proper identification can be tricky. The Kayan tend to use basic black, white, and yellow beads of medium size and the Kenyah tend to use more colors (especially orange) and have a little more fancy work with more spirals, figures, and animals. I have started to use the term "K-Group" (a blatant rip-off of the "S-Group" term used by Turkoman rug fanatics) to describe beadwork from the Kayan, Kenyah, or Kelabit when I am unsure of the exact identity. It is most likely from the last half of the 20th century. The same on the sunhat panel.

The beaded sitting mat that John has is Maloh, not Iban. The shell work baby carrier is Kenyah (at least that is the general consensus). Both are probably from the second half of the 20th century, although I would need to see the shell piece to be sure if it is not older.

The two pieces that John showed on the other page are real stunners! They are Bahau or Modang (two related groups) and the beadwork is early 20th century, possibly late 19th century. The hats were worn by un-married women and are very rare to find now. The panel is from a similar hat, but where the entire hat band is covered in that long panel and not with the two smaller panels as in the photo of the other piece (I have had a few of those over the years). The Bahau/Modang work often uses these tiny, tiny beads or the larger ones and rarely do they use the medium beads (I have no idea why). The amazing thing about their beadwork is they make use of the negative space and every colored element on the panels are stylized animals, birds, or other figures. They can get insanely abstract and most observers would not believe they are looking at anything distinct. However, if you look at a wide selection of Bahau/Modang beadwork (especially after studying their use of abstraction in wood carvings, masks, and painted house panels), you begin to see the figurative elements and one will generally be comfortable believing they exist in the overly abstract examples. Fun stuff!

I hope to be writing on an upcoming bead collection catalog and the most of the text will be deal with these issues of reading patterns, showing their uses, and identifying the proper tribal affiliations.

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Mark Johnson

http://www.markajohnson.com
Mark A. Johnson Tribal Art


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2004 4:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 7:35 pm
Posts: 175
Location: east coast
Mark - Thanks for your expert input. I wish I had you on my shelf for handy reference on tricky issues! I corrected my catalogue entries following your information. I did note that I indeed had Maloh for the mat. Not sure why I said Iban. Force of habit maybe.

We are anxiously awaiting your book on beads. Put me down for a copy now.

-John




Mark Johnson wrote:
Looking over these last images and the two John posted on another page, I thought I would add some additional information. The baby carrier Pamela posted is probably Kenyah, but may be Kayan. The Kenyah, Kayan, and Kelabit groups have very similar motifs, so proper identification can be tricky. The Kayan tend to use basic black, white, and yellow beads of medium size and the Kenyah tend to use more colors (especially orange) and have a little more fancy work with more spirals, figures, and animals. I have started to use the term "K-Group" (a blatant rip-off of the "S-Group" term used by Turkoman rug fanatics) to describe beadwork from the Kayan, Kenyah, or Kelabit when I am unsure of the exact identity. It is most likely from the last half of the 20th century. The same on the sunhat panel.

The beaded sitting mat that John has is Maloh, not Iban. The shell work baby carrier is Kenyah (at least that is the general consensus). Both are probably from the second half of the 20th century, although I would need to see the shell piece to be sure if it is not older.

The two pieces that John showed on the other page are real stunners! They are Bahau or Modang (two related groups) and the beadwork is early 20th century, possibly late 19th century. The hats were worn by un-married women and are very rare to find now. The panel is from a similar hat, but where the entire hat band is covered in that long panel and not with the two smaller panels as in the photo of the other piece (I have had a few of those over the years). The Bahau/Modang work often uses these tiny, tiny beads or the larger ones and rarely do they use the medium beads (I have no idea why). The amazing thing about their beadwork is they make use of the negative space and every colored element on the panels are stylized animals, birds, or other figures. They can get insanely abstract and most observers would not believe they are looking at anything distinct. However, if you look at a wide selection of Bahau/Modang beadwork (especially after studying their use of abstraction in wood carvings, masks, and painted house panels), you begin to see the figurative elements and one will generally be comfortable believing they exist in the overly abstract examples. Fun stuff!

I hope to be writing on an upcoming bead collection catalog and the most of the text will be deal with these issues of reading patterns, showing their uses, and identifying the proper tribal affiliations.

_________________
John


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