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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:57 pm 
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Ah technology...I've finally found my way back to the forum. In the interim, I've made several more journeys to Southeast Asia including Myanmar (Burma), 3 more trips to Laos and back to Nepal. I have also opened a store , Bijoux, and in that capacity, I've met many travelers and textile collectors. I have been given 3 embroidered pieces by a woman who got them in Kunming, China, about 10-12 years ago. I do not think they are very old, however, they are very well done and in excellent condition. I think they are Miao, but beyond that, I haven't a clue. This is not my area of knowledge. Can anyone give me some information on who did them and what they are for? Perhaps only for sale to tourists? I do have close ups if that would be helpful.
Thanks


Attachments:
2877w.jpg
2877w.jpg [ 84.59 KiB | Viewed 15620 times ]
File comment: This piece is 32 x 37 inches
2873w.jpg
2873w.jpg [ 62.75 KiB | Viewed 15620 times ]
dscn2883smw.jpg
dscn2883smw.jpg [ 75.22 KiB | Viewed 15630 times ]
File comment: Measures 33x38
dscn2876smw.jpg
dscn2876smw.jpg [ 80.68 KiB | Viewed 15630 times ]
File comment: Measures 32.5 x 34
dscn2874smw.jpg
dscn2874smw.jpg [ 77.74 KiB | Viewed 15630 times ]


Last edited by Shelley Muzzy on Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 7:26 pm 
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Congratulations on your successful posting of the photos!

These pieces look very striking. Could you give sizes and some close-ups would be good so that we can see the embroidery stitches. They are probably pieces for selling on rather than personal use but based in tradition and perhaps babycarrier styles. The people and animals around the border in 2883 and 2876 are particularly attractive.

I am not immediately sure of their origin but they have overtones of familiarity.

[If you don't mind I am going to reduce the file size further so that they don't take so long to load for people with slow internet connections.]

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:27 am 
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In the embroidery section of the book "Minjian Ran Zhi Meishu", there are a few examples of pieces very similar to yours. They are attributed to the Yi minority from Lunan Stone Forest, and are described as "seven color embroidered square kerchiefs".

The book describes three styles. The first is the traditional design, made up of three overlapping layers of the sunburst pattern. The second is a design used for older members of the group that does not employ the sunburst design, and uses "cooler" colors - mostly dark blues and purples. The third is the "updated" pattern, comprising of two overlapping layers of the sunburst pattern, surrounded by other design elements. The first two pieces you posted seem to fall into this third category, though the book makes no mention of the final border of animal and human figures that your pieces have. However that design element is quite common on textiles from Guangxi.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:32 am 
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Jon

Very interesting! Does the book show how the 'kerchiefs' are worn? Would they be worn on the head?

thanks,

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 9:11 am 
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I'm afraid the book does not have any pictures of these items being used. They are indeed head scarves though, and would be worn by the young women of this particular group.

There is some more accompanying text I haven't quite worked through yet. Skimming it though, it seems to be talking about how the pattern represents the sun shining through after the rain to create rainbows, which is a symbol of love for this group. By wearing rainbows, the girls are supposed to constantly both inspire and be inspired by love.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 2:03 pm 
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Just shows how senile I am getting, with a shocking memory! I searched for 'Lunan Stone Forest' and realised that it was the Stone Forest, Shilin that I visited in 2000. Here is a link to a photogallery that I put together on the Stone Forest based on photos from my visit. http://www.tribaltextiles.info/Gallerie ... Forest.htm As I say by way of introduction:
Quote:
"There is a Sani (part of the Yi minority) village which is right at the edge of the lake which forms part of the Stone Forest tourist area. The Sani work within the area and are active traders at textile stalls around the lake. The traders are tough bargainers - but with humour."


Three of us on the trip visited the market sellers at the Stone Forest and had a good time looking at their wares and making some purchases. It was difficult, however, to tell how original pieces were - and I found some considerable alteration looking closely later at a bag that I bought. I post here a photo of a babycarrier being worn by one of the woman traders and you will see that the centre-piece is very familiar indeed based on Shelley's photos!

It is very possible that the pieces that Shelley has came from the Sani at the Stone Forest (Stone Forest, Shilin, Stone Forest county, Yunnan). There is another photo in my photogallery of an old woman approaching the tourists with a small piece of embroidery which she had made. Stone Forest is a major tourist spot (especially for local Chinese tourists) and the woman who gave the 3 embroidered pieces to Shelley, as we know that she visited Yunnan, could well have visited here and bought. Similar pieces could also easily have found their way to Kunming.


Attachments:
File comment: Sani baby in a traditional embroidered baby carrier - Stone Forest, Shilin, Stone Forest county, Yunnan province October 2000
0010B05w.jpg
0010B05w.jpg [ 75.74 KiB | Viewed 15552 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 3:01 pm 
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I was so worried about my memory that I have been digging through my boxes of textiles from my 2000 trip to SW China. I found the Sani (part of Yi minority) pieces that I bought in the Stone Forest. There is nothing that is really like the babycarrier shown in my photo (or Shelley's pieces). The babycarrier piece I bought had the same framing style as the black velvet in the one shown being worn but a completely different embroidery and applique. I am posting below a girl's hat that I bought which I think is relatively old and possibly has natural dyes. (I know that Monique likes children's hats so this is especially for her!). There is some fine cross stitch embroidery on the hat and that is why I particularly selected it to show here.


Attachments:
File comment: Side view of Sani girl's hat bought in the Stone Forest, Shilin, Oct 2000
IMGP6274w.jpg
IMGP6274w.jpg [ 73.7 KiB | Viewed 15543 times ]
File comment: Back view of Sani girl's hat bought in the Stone Forest, Shilin, Oct 2000
IMGP6271w.jpg
IMGP6271w.jpg [ 65.72 KiB | Viewed 15543 times ]
File comment: Detail 1 of Sani girl's hat bought in the Stone Forest, Shilin, Oct 2000
IMGP6273w.jpg
IMGP6273w.jpg [ 65.6 KiB | Viewed 15543 times ]
File comment: Detail 2 of Sani girl's hat bought in the Stone Forest, Shilin, Oct 2000
IMGP6272w.jpg
IMGP6272w.jpg [ 71.05 KiB | Viewed 15543 times ]
File comment: embroidered end of streamer to Sani girl's hat bought in the Stone Forest, Shilin, Oct 2000
IMGP6276w.jpg
IMGP6276w.jpg [ 62.97 KiB | Viewed 15543 times ]

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:18 am 
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As usual I sent forum member Ann B Goodman a copy of the forum weekly digest. (As her ISP is AOL they 'sensor' all auto generated emails including anything from the forum!)

I received back from Ann some questions and photos of textiles in her collection which she believes to be Yi. I am going to post her questions here as she is seeking help from the forum in further identifying her textiles. As you will see, she has also asked me for photos of any other Yi Sani textiles I have and also further photos of the headdress already posted. I need to get out the textiles and sort out to for photography and will post later. Meanwhile I am posting her questions and the photos of her textiles below:

Quote:
Dear Pamela,
Again thanks for the weekly digest. I saw your post of the Sani Stone Forest headdress. I have a Yi headdress and didn't know anything about it, but it looks to me similar to your Sani piece. Could you please send me more photos of the woman's Sani headdress. And do you think the the attached man's headdress is also Sani? Do you have any other photos of Yi Sani outfits? Or do you know where I can find out more about this group? Of course, I hope you will post this photo and my questions so that others in the Forum may comment.

Best regards,
Ann


Further emails from Ann:
Quote:
Here goes again. I will also send the complete man's outfit with tunic, belt and skirt. Are these Sani pieces? The tunic is hemp with wool embroidery and a zigzag back. The skirt is wool tightly woven multicolor and the shag is made of individual pieces of hemp strips (over 300). What do you think? Ann


Quote:
Here's another piece that I don't know about. Do you think that this is a Sani (Yi) baby carrier. The plaid applique strips are typically Yi but I don't know about the rest. The calendared cloth is unusual for Yi and the embroidery looks more Dong. I am puzzled and appreciate help from The Forum.
Ann


I have gone to my library to try and seek help from a book that I have had for some time: "The costumes and adornments of Chinese Yi Nationality Picture Album" published by Beijing Arts and Crafts Publishing House, preface dated Sep 1989, first printing 1990, second printing 1994 ISBN 7-80526-033-8. I did an ISBN search and it seems to be out of print new although various sellers are saying they can take orders. There are some (expensive) second hand copies available. I have found similar textiles in the section 'The southeast Yunnan model, Lunan style' to the ones I collected in the Stone Forest. I will discuss this further when I post more photos of the textiles in my collection.


Attachments:
File comment: Ann Goodman't textile: 'do you think the the attached man's headdress is also Sani?'
Library-3262.jpg
Library-3262.jpg [ 70.13 KiB | Viewed 15498 times ]
File comment: Ann Goodman's textiles: 'complete man's outfit with tunic, belt and skirt. Are these Sani pieces? The tunic is hemp with wool embroidery and a zigzag back. The skirt is wool tightly woven multicolor and the shag is made of individual pieces of hemp str
Yi-.jpg
Yi-.jpg [ 67.84 KiB | Viewed 15498 times ]
File comment: Ann Goodman's textile: 'Do you think that this is a Sani (Yi) baby carrier. The plaid applique strips are typically Yi but I don't know about the rest. The calendared cloth is unusual for Yi and the embroidery looks more Dong'.
Sani-BC.jpg
Sani-BC.jpg [ 69.53 KiB | Viewed 15498 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:03 am 
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Before I post any more photos of my textiles from the Yi (Sani) of the Stone Forest I want to post info on the 'kerchiefs' which Shelley posted and then Jon (JT_BJ) explained.

In the book on the Yi which I refer to above ("The costumes and adornments of Chinese Yi Nationality Picture Album") on page 119 there is a photo of: 'Handkerchief with cross-stitch work. Yi women in Lunan are very good at cross-stitch craft. A handkerchief with full cross-stitch work and full embroidery has always been used as a betrothal token between lovers.' There is then a photo of a fully stitched piece which I will post below. It does not have the 'sunburst' pattern, unfortunately, but otherwise has very considerable similarities to the ones that Shelley has posted. Sorry the corner of kerchief is cut off in the photo but the book is very big and unwieldy for the scanner!

The book makes no mention of a name 'Sani' for this group of Yi but puts together as similar 'Yi...from Lunan Guishan, Shilin, West Mile and part of East Mile districts...'

I have had a hunt on the web for Yi... Sani... and found some references. One is particularly frustrating as the Google search findings text quotes: "The Sani MfE are the largest Yi E subgroup in the Lunan region, with a population of about 35000. The folk heroine Ashima WI,MfA, promoted in tourist ..." but when you get to the link it is a jstor.org article where you have to be a member to see access it. Details: Author(s) of Review: Mark Bender Asian Folklore Studies, Vol. 60, No. 1 (2001), pp. 168-172 doi:10.2307/1178712 link
http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0385-2342(2001)60%3A1%3C168%3ALYMYYL%3E2.0.CO%3B2-N [for some reason I cannot get the whole URL to come out as a link (it stops before(2001) and using the url tags does not work either! to get to the link put all the text between the 2 url tags - ignoring spaces - into your browser]

At http://www.planeta.com/ecotravel/mexico ... rson3.html there is an article by Amy Elizabeth Anderson comparing ethnic tourism in Mexico with ethnic tourism elsewhere. In Chapter 3 Issues of Comparison, Issue 1 Economic Development she says:
Quote:
"Many forms of economic development associated with ethnic tourism are occurring in China such as with the Sani Yi of Lunan Yi Autonomous County (Swain 1990). Tourism has proceeded rapidly both through government subsidization and the Sani's self-promotion and hard work. The Sani have aggressively marketed their embroidered bags, some have changed their homes into hotels and restaurants, and others advertise "authentic" dance performances, foods, and goods. However, massive tourism and the resulting economic development have changed the Sani Yi from "traditional" people to avid marketers of their culture, a culture that now seems only to exist for tourism. "


If you want to find out about (the legend of) Ashima and the Sani people go to http://www.kepu.net.cn/english/national ... 10022.html and there is outline information about the group:
Quote:
"The Sani is a branch of the Yis, which has a population of over 90,000. It mainly spread over the Stone Forest scenic spot in Shilin (the primary Lunan Yi Autonomous County) in Yunnan province. Its language belongs to the southeastern dialect. Sani people's clothes have a unique style. Men usually wrap head with black cloth, wear jacket with cloth buttons down the front, cover a sleeveless flax garment with buttons down the front, and wear black trousers. Women wrap a piece of cloth around their head which appears a little square with a board as framework, wear clothes with wide front, drape a sheep skin cape over shoulders, and wear long trousers instead of skirt. The Sani people are especially good at singing and dancing, and are versatile. Provided you enter Sani villages, you will hear clear and melodious sound of flute and melodious and resonant singing."


Further results of my web search provided the following information that you may (or may not (!)) be interested to know - that the Sani are one of the only cheese makers in China - the other is the Bai. Go to http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:t0LH ... d=16&gl=uk

Some excerpts from a much longer article by Bryan Allen and Silvia Allen:
Quote:
Mozzarella of the East - (Cheese-making and Bai culture)
Bryan Allen and Silvia Allen – SIL International

It is well known that the Chinese traditionally are not fond of eating dairy products. Only in the last few years, under Western influence, have milk, yoghurt, butter and cheese become available in large cities. Most Han Chinese still feel a certain revulsion when it comes to cheese. Yet the Bai have produced and consumed two varieties of cheese for centuries. This is doubly surprising when one considers that very few minority groups in the whole of China traditionally make any kind of cheese. Of further interest is the fact that the Sani, a small minority group living near Kunming, make the same kind of cheese as the Bai. This suggests some kind of connection, and we argue that their common cheese is evidence that at least some of the Sani people migrated from the Dali area."

Quote:
"Sani cheese
The Sani people also make cheese. Although not officially recognised as an independent minority, the 90,000 Sani maintain a distinctive language and culture, and are often referred to as the Sani minority. Actually they are classified as a branch of the Yi, who live in Lunan, 70 kilometres south-east of Kunming in Yunnan province. (My 'bold', Pamela) A guidebook to Yunnan states, “Lunan is famous not only for the Stone Forest, but also for its dairy product—the ‘rubing’ (milk curd) of goat's milk. About five pounds of goat's milk can be made into one pound of ‘rubing’. ‘Rubing’ of good quality is yellowish, giving no sour scent.”

In the Sani language their cheese is named 'sheep tofu'. The Sani make their rubing in the same way as the Bai, except that they do not use a press; while the curds are wrapped in a handkerchief, they simply use their hands to squeeze out as much whey as they can. Instead of using a vegetable extract to curdle the milk, they use a little of the previous day's whey which has been left to sour. If this is not available, they can also use vinegar. The resulting cheese is also eaten fried, generally on special occasions. Much of the rubing on sale in Kunming comes from Lunan.

It is interesting that there are two minorities in Yunnan province who traditionally make the same cheese yet live five hundred kilometers apart, a considerable distance when one considers the lack of communications in the past. Although it is conceivable that they each discovered rubing independently, it would seem unlikely. Although many Yi are pastoralists, they do not make cheese or use any milk products. The Sani are an unusual Yi group in this regard, though even for them, raising goats is a peripheral activity: theirs is a wet rice economy."


See http://en.chinastoneforest.com/show.aspx?aid=613 for info on the Sani:
Quote:
"Sani People

There are Sani People in Shilin County. As a branch of Yi, they are mainly distributed in Shilin County, Luxi County, Mile County, Qiubei County, Yiliang County and Luliang County.

Sani People call themselves “Ni”, meaning happy people. They are diligent, brave and good at singing and dancing. Sani People have deep feeling for almost every hill and stone. There is a touching story concerning every scenic spot and the most popular is The Story of Ashima.

As a branch of Yi, Sani People enjoy some common cultural features such as similar character, religion and customs with the other branches of Yi. But they have their own features in religion, costumes and buildings.

Yi People boast a long history. Their ancestors admired tigers and regarded tigers as their totem. But besides tigers, the totems of Sani also include spiders.

The flower headband of Sani women is an attractive artwork. The headband is made of silk cloth of seven colors, i.e. red, green, blue, brown, yellow, black and orange. Silver balls are nailed on the brim and a pair of “colorful butterflies” is embroidered on the two sides. Two strings of beads are hung at the back with silver bells tied on the ends. The silver bells tinkle when the girls walk. The jacket sleeves of the girls are made of colorful silk cloth with two wide strips of laces. The left front of the clothes is mauve or black fine hair cloth embroidered with cow nose shape laces. A lamb budge covered with black fine hair cloth is used on the back. Sani girls always carry an embroidered handbag and wear colorful waist band behind, just like the ties of gentlemen. So it has been said that “the costumes of the Sani girls are strange, the ties of western suits are used as waist bands.” They used to wear homemade cloth trousers, but now they wear western pants. Their shoes have also changed from the former embroidered ones to the current sneakers or high-heeled shoes.
  
In Shilin County, the houses of the Sani have various forms due to different natural conditions. The saying “earth house in Haiyi, stone house in Nuohei, fence house in Hehe and couch grass house in Yuhu” summarizes the representative dwellings of the four places.

Earth houses are made of earth and wood and are always two-storied. While the upper floor is for the residence of man, the lower level is used to enclose cattle. Stone houses are always two-floor with three rooms on each floor. Different from earth-based houses and brick houses, the girders, pillars, rafters and floors are all made of wood and the back wall and front wall are built with slates.

Fence houses take stones as the base of walls. The walls are made of fences knitted with bamboo and branches covered with earth. The couch grass houses take stones as bases. The walls are built with pounded earth. Strong logs or square wood are used as pillars. The double-slope roof is made of couch grass. The couch grass house is humbler than the brick-and-tile house, but it costs less and is warm in winter and cool in summer.


Apologies for all the quotes but I am particularly posting here for both Shelley and for Ann as I know that she is keen to have more information about the Yi.


Attachments:
File comment: 'Handkerchief with cross-stitch work. Yi women in Lunan are very good at cross-stitch craft. A handkerchief with full cross-stitch work and full embroidery has always been used as a betrothal token between lovers - from page 119 The costumes and adornmen
Yi-lunan-kerchief-Yibk.jpg
Yi-lunan-kerchief-Yibk.jpg [ 70.37 KiB | Viewed 15440 times ]

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Last edited by Pamela on Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:58 am, edited 2 times in total.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:11 pm 
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As you will have gathered, I wear many hats and am many people on this forum! I have just received the following email from Martin Conlan:
Quote:
Hello Pamela,

Just a quick message regarding the Sani pieces.

Very interesting about the rubing/cheese which I love [the best one comes from Heqing].

Bryan and Sylvia are old friends from many years ago studying & creating a written form of the Bai language whilst raising 3 children in rural Yunnan.

Ann Goodman's Sani (Yi) Carrier is actually a Dong Carrier from Congjiang Co.

Hope that helps,

Martin


Martin Conlan,
Slow Loris
Indigo & Vegetable Dyed Clothing
Oriental Tribal Clothing & Textiles."

Perhaps one day I will be successful in persuading Martin to join the forum....there again, perhaps not!

best

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:54 pm 
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I am posting below photos of my Yi Sani babycarrier top. The cross-stitch centre seems to be on an hand woven piece of cotton. Possibly dyed with indigo - it is a very dark blue/black. The 'frame' is machine manufactured cotton twill, almost black but probably not home dyed. The centre of my babycarrier is 40 cm x 42 cm and the surround is approc 15 cm wide. As you will see from the details, there is applied narrow, hand made, two-colour braid around some of the motifs and, in some cases, this is red with a light spot. I am going to show first a photo of a babycarrier from page 119 of the Yi book mentioned above.


Attachments:
File comment: Small embroidered quilt for carrying a baby on the back. The embroidery in the center is 33 cm. long and 27 cm. wide. (Page 119 of "The costumes and adornments of Chinese Yi Nationality Picture Album")
Yi-lunan-bc-Yibk.jpg
Yi-lunan-bc-Yibk.jpg [ 61.14 KiB | Viewed 15404 times ]
File comment: Yi Sani babycarrier top - embroidered in cross-stitch and with applied two-colour hand made braid to outline some of the motifs
bc1005.jpg
bc1005.jpg [ 64.7 KiB | Viewed 15404 times ]
File comment: Embroidered square in Yi Sani babycarrier top
bc6283.jpg
bc6283.jpg [ 79.97 KiB | Viewed 15404 times ]
File comment: centre motif on a Yi Sani babycarrier top
bc6285w.jpg
bc6285w.jpg [ 71.99 KiB | Viewed 15404 times ]
File comment: detail of a corner of a Yi (Sani) babycarrier top showing cross-stitch embroidery and applied narrow braid to outline some of the motifs - in this case red with a natural spot
bc6287w.jpg
bc6287w.jpg [ 69.89 KiB | Viewed 15404 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 2:16 pm 
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I post photos of what I was told was a belt for a Sani Yi woman. I show a detail of where you can see the piecing and fine cross-stitch embroidery. The textile has been pieced from several fabrics (both front and back). I think that the fabric has been home dyed and perhaps from natural dyes. It would have been much brighter when new judging from sight of fabric on my girl's cap where you can see where it has been hidden from the light. The soft orange might have been an orangey/red colour. There is a photo of a model wearing a Yi outfit from the Lunan Guishan, Shilin, West Mile and part of East Mile districts in the Yi book - page 116. However, the embroidery on this is different from my belt and similar to that on the wide carrying 'straps' of the bags which I still have to post.

I feel that this belt is quite an old example. It is 85 cm x 9 cm.

I did wonder, looking at the 'belt' now whether, in fact, it might not be the outer band which wraps around the headdress worn by the Sani Yi women in this area. However, I have stuck with belt as that was what we thought it was as I was buying it.


Attachments:
File comment: what I was told was a Sani Yi woman's belt - pieced and embroidered
b6302w.jpg
b6302w.jpg [ 64.75 KiB | Viewed 15390 times ]
File comment: what I was told was a Sani Yi woman's belt - back
b1026w.jpg
b1026w.jpg [ 68.21 KiB | Viewed 15390 times ]
File comment: detail of what I was told was a Sani Yi woman's belt - front showing cross-stitch
b6296w.jpg
b6296w.jpg [ 66.03 KiB | Viewed 15390 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 2:31 pm 
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Ann wanted to see some more of the girl's hat which I have already shown. I show a close-up of the spiky metal 'beads' which are sewn around the edge. I think that this group and several other Yi groups like to sew on metal beads and baubles. I also show a detail where you can see two of the fabrics with less fading. Also a shot showing the 'streamers' from the back of the hat better.


Attachments:
File comment: Sani Yi girl's hat
hat1072.jpg
hat1072.jpg [ 66.71 KiB | Viewed 15382 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi girl's hat
hat6323w.jpg
hat6323w.jpg [ 63.34 KiB | Viewed 15382 times ]
File comment: detail of Sani Yi girl's hat showing fading of fabric in a 'streamer' from the back of the hat
hat6329w.jpg
hat6329w.jpg [ 52.12 KiB | Viewed 15382 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi girl's hat - detail
hat999w.jpg
hat999w.jpg [ 66.97 KiB | Viewed 15382 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:44 pm 
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Getting to the end of my Yi Sani textiles you will be relieved to know - 2 bags.

Bag 1 has probably the older fabrics in it of the two. I have a strong sense that both bags have been re-made as is quite usual to preserve finely made pieces of textile. Bag 1 is very like a bag shown on page 118 of the Yi book where one (with the same two-colour shoulder strap and similar embroidered ends) is photographed: "The hanging bag with bell designs used by young girls."

Both bags are quite heavy both from the cotton string with top macrame detail and also from the heavy, hand spun and hand woven striped linings. In Bag 1 the striped fabric is only on one face of the lining whilst in Bag 2 it is both faces.

Bag 2 has a strip of pieced work as well as embroidery. I have not actually tied the shoulder strap to the base of bag 2 but it should be connected in a similar way to bag 1.

In the Yi book striped fabric similar to that used in the bag linings is used for a man's sleeveless jacket. This striped woven material might be cotton or might be a bast fibre.


Attachments:
File comment: Sani Yi bag 2
bg2_6338w.jpg
bg2_6338w.jpg [ 72.01 KiB | Viewed 15356 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi bag 2 showing embroidery on face of bag and shoulder strap ends. The bottom ends of the shoulder strap are embroidered and then there is machine woven ribbon
bg2_6334w.jpg
bg2_6334w.jpg [ 72.96 KiB | Viewed 15356 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi bag 2 showing the lining
bg_26342w.jpg
bg_26342w.jpg [ 71.23 KiB | Viewed 15356 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi bag 1
bg1_6314w.jpg
bg1_6314w.jpg [ 54.63 KiB | Viewed 15356 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi bag 1 showing embroidered face and the two ends of the shoulder tie
bg1_1038w.jpg
bg1_1038w.jpg [ 73.42 KiB | Viewed 15356 times ]
File comment: Sani Yi bag 1 showing various linings
bg1_1047w.jpg
bg1_1047w.jpg [ 64.79 KiB | Viewed 15355 times ]

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Pamela

http://www.tribaltextiles.info
on-line tribal textiles resource
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:18 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2003 5:45 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Washington State
Thank you all so much for the information! This will help me immensely, and also broadens my knowledge base. If anyone else cares to weigh in, please feel free. Having never been to China nor having delved into that specific area's textiles, these pieces have piqued my curiosity. My store in this small corner of the US has become information central for everyone's miscellaneous textiles, most of which were acquired on trips to various parts of the world. While I do have limited knowledge of diverse areas, this forum really helps a lot when people come to me with questions.


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